Beginner Tutorial Videos For Hitfilm Express

Hi all,

I see there are many video tutorials for Hitfilm, which is great.

Could someone please direct me to beginner video tutorials which start at the very beginning, assuming I know nothing at all?

The how-to videos I've found so far all seem to assume I understand  the basic operations of Hitfilm, so I'm immediately lost.

I have the manual so I'll start digging in to that while awaiting your suggestions. 

Thanks!

 

Comments

  • edited August 15

    @PhilTanny @Triem23 has put together THE definitive series on Hitfilm from beginning to date on his channel called Hitfilm University

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoxIFCFVZMs0-JSrrZREZdQ

     

    This should take you to his Playlist in order  (I was mistaken.  It's in reverse order. Scroll to number one at the bottom) and will help immensely in overcoming those beginning blues.

  • @PhilTanny I would have to recommend my complete beginners video :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-OwICw2pe8

  • Many thanks tddavis, appreciated.  I'll check those vids out for sure.  First on my list for the morning.

    Here's a link to the Essential HitFilm series, in case any other newbies visit this thread. 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EY628LlfISM&list=PLgfiM46Y0Ue0sk4ACtkEy9TPWO6JbgD79

    Thanks to  you too Yeremyah, appreciate  your assistance!

     

  •  You are very welcome :) All the best.

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator

    Despite being the guy doing Hitfilm University, I actually think this Surfaced Studio tutorial waa the best "Quick Intro" to Hitfilm 4 Express. Everything is still relevant in Hitfilm 2017. 

    https://youtu.be/liduoxsYNsE

    After that... Well, Hit-U is certainly the most detailed series of tutorials. :) 

  • Hey, thanks for joining the thread Triem.  I'm off to sign up for classes at HFU.   Thanks for your vids.   

    I expect it's only a matter of time before I'm a well known mover and shaker big time Hollywood producer dating starlets and doing lunch with Jack Nicholson. 

  • Triem,

    Digging in to your Essential Hitfilm series.   Quick first impression...

    1) The background sound track should probably go.  Sorry, it's edgy, hip and cool, but distracting.

    2) Not suitable for newbies.  You immediately (Project Settings) dive in to terminology which is basic and obvious for you, but mysterious and perplexing to those new to video editing.

    #2 is not necessarily a failing, it depends on who your target audience is.  Who is that?

  • @PhilTanny Did you find my video tutorial helpful? It's for complete beginners.

  • @Yeremyah, yes I watched it, it was helpful, thanks.  I thought it was a good overview of some basic features.   My video editing experience is largely limited to the 1938 version of iMovie :-) and a bit of exploring of some alternative apps similar to iMovie.  I was able to follow your vid without difficulty, and it encouraged me to keep going.

    Triem's videos seem very well suited for the kind of person who, for instance, has been using After Effects and wants to explore Hitfilm as an alternative.  As best I can tell, the series seems very thorough and clear, assuming that one already knows a good bit about video editing. 

    The bottom line is the question of whether Hitfilm seeks to serve those relatively inexperienced with video editing.  You know, either brand new to video editing, or perhaps your typical iMovie user.   If pulling such folks in and advancing them up the sales chain is not a goal of this project, then most of my comments on the newbie topic can be dismissed.

    So far, first impression, Hitfilm seems best designed for the After Effects user who is tired of the Creative Cloud concept, which is probably a lot of folks.

  • Aladdin4dAladdin4d Moderator

    @PhilTanny I understand your viewpoint and this isn't a criticism of it. I think the real issue is you are starting in something where the learning curve is, unfortunately, an exponential one. Going beyond iMovie or Windows Movie Maker is generally going to be an all or nothing proposition.

    Everything you're going to be doing is made up of a bunch smaller operations even if it's just a "canned" effect. By the time all the code is written to do all the steps to make a canned effect you might as well make those steps available to the end user who can then tweak and modify steps to end up with something that isn't a canned effect but a unique creation. If you don't, the user is going to use the canned effect once or twice and move on to different package with different canned effects or a package that does let them tweak and modify the steps. 

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator

    @PhilTanny Sorry, which specific episode(s) aren't as clear as you could wish?  I think Project Settings are discussed in multiple episodes. The series is obviously imperfect, and, starting a beginner's series when *I* have 30 years of experience means I'll certainly overlook something that's obvious to me but new to someone else, so feedback is always helpful as I continue the series. 

    Background music: I'm stubborn on that--you're not the first to suggest removing it, and I won't, but later episodes in the series have the music mixed at a much lower level. 

    Project Settings: 

    Resolution sets the individual pixels--or dots on screen--by horizontal dimension followed by vertical dimension. So 1280x720 is 1280 pixels across and 720 down. For video work, the desired dimensions are often determined by the resolution of clips to ve imported. The two most common resolutions in 2017 are 1920x1080 (also called Full High Definition, FHD or just 1080p) and 3840x2160 (also Ultra High Definition, UHD, or 4k).

    Most video formats today are in a 16:9 aspect ratio, meaning the horizontal resolution is 16 units wide compared to a vertical resolution of 9 pixels high. 

    There are exceptions, but those usually come up if using a 10+ year old HDV camera, or a 4k cinema camera shooting 4096x2160 4k at a 1.9:1 aspect ratio. 

    Frames per second determines the number of individual frames in one second of video. 23.96 and 29.97 are North American TV/DVD/Blu-Ray standards. 25 is European TV/DVD/Blu-ray. 24 is true film. 50 and 60 are high-frame rate standards for Europe abd North America, respectively. 

    Common output values are 25 and 29.97, usually determined by the frame rate of imported media. 

    Pixel aspect ratio refers to the shape of the individual pixels. Usually this will be 1.0. Unless one is using an HDV camera or shooting with true anamorphic cameras, in which case it's 1.33

    Shadow, Reflection and (in Pro) Texture Map sizes define the size of the internal buffer Hitfilm uses to calculate Reflections and shadows. I believe this buffer is a square, so a value of 4096 makes a 4096x4096 buffer. 

    Hopefully this helps fill in the gaps? 

    Essential Hitfilm Episodes 07 and 08 go into more detail on digital video specs and how computers render video. 

    The intended flow of information is something like this. 

    Episode 01--navigation of the interface, so one knows where buttons are. 

    Episode 02--How to bring all types of media in, and export when done. 

    Episode 03--Video Editing tools. 

    Episode 04--Audio Tools. 

    These first four episodes should get vloggers and game video episodes 95% of the way to doing what they want to do, only leaving out text, titles and intros. 

    Episode 05 is an overview of Composite Shots and largely expands Episode 01 and attempts to define various media types and covers some of Hitfilm's internal logic--Order of Operations is important. 

    Episode 06--a specific, focused  episode defining 2D blend modes. 

    Episode 07--more information on video files and compression types, with a focus on optimizing files for performance in Hitfilm. 

    Episode 08--ways of combining images in 2D layers. The "Lecture" in the first 15 minutes is actually the initial impetus for the entire series. If you can really "get" that down, so many tasks become easier to plan... 

    Episodes 09, 10, 11--Animation tools in detail. This is when I decided to keep all episodes under about 30 minutes. One-hour episodes are too long and too dense. 

    Episodes 12, 13, 14 and... 15? Cameras in-depth. Looking like it'll be a four parter, but on-hold while I finish a film commission. 

    After Cameras will be Lights. 

    After Lights, the series will return to an in-depth look at Text. 

    After Text is Masking and Rotoscoping. 

    After that.... Well, I may juggle the order. 

  • @PhilTanny My video for example is for the complete beginner user.  Triem's videos are more aimed at intermediate to advanced users.

    Start with the basics, learn as much as you can about the core foundational things, then when you watch Triem's videos later after an increased awareness and higher insight, his videos will make more sense.

    Patience is the key, learning something new, it's about patience and growth.

    All the best:)

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator

    @Yeremyah I beg to differ--Essential Hitfilm is very much aimed at beginners (Why else would I start with an interface tour--something no one else ever did--and Import/Export?).

    You'll know when I start aiming for intermediate and advanced users, because that's when I'll stop explaining every button. ;-) 

  • It depends on the person, it's very subjective to the individual.  Some may believe that something is a  "beginner" information, yet someone else may believe it's "intermediate and advanced" in their relative understanding.

    The "no explaining button" videos from you sound scary lol ;) 

  • Great discussion guys, thanks for that.   I find I'm always incurably interested in such topics, a kind of genetic flaw really.

    Triem, in my pompous opinion, your video series is very appropriate for beginners if by that we mean "new to Hitfilm".  As example, if someone has been using Premiere or Final Cut Pro and they want to explore Hitfilm as an alternative (and why wouldn't they given the price difference) then your videos seem pretty much perfect, as best I can tell from my inexperienced position.  

    If by beginner we meant "new to video editing", then your videos, and Hitfilm in general, generously provide way too much power and information way too soon, again, imho.

    The bottom line question really seems to be, is it worth it for the Hitfilm team to try to serve true beginners?  You know, someone who has never edited videos, or the casual iMovie type user.  I don't assume that it is  worth it, and surely one could make many good arguments against trying to target that market.  For example, how many people in this group will ever wind up buying anything?  It's a very large group, but do they on average bring anything of value to the table?   Obviously, if it were decided that targeting real beginners is not a promising project, then that ends the problem right there.

    On the other hand, if the Hitfilm team did want to target the true beginner market, the first step would probably be to recognize that they are currently not prepared to do so.   Yes, there are a TON of  great tutorials available, an excellent manual etc.   But that tidal wave of information and power is not an asset to true beginners, it's a large  discouraging obstacle. 

    All across the Net, this problem is typically addressed  by the more experienced users lecturing the less experienced users on how they need to "man up" and do the homework etc.   This will surely work for some, but it ignores the fact that it won't work for most, and is really sort of an excuse for the developers not learning how to teach.

    Effective teaching isn't something everyone is born knowing how to do.  The experts at effective teaching spend their entire careers learning how to master it, just as coding is a life long journey.  And being expert at coding a program, or using that program, really has nothing at all to do with effective teaching.

    Personally, I find the subject of effective teaching endlessly fascinating and very closely related to software interface design. I just find the challenge of making something  complex very accessible to be quite interesting.

    But that doesn't automatically equal it being a good business plan for every software developer to target the true beginner market.   I'm not  arguing that Hitfilm should target that market.  I really don't know.  My point is more that any developer should be very clear minded  about who their target market is. 

     

     

     

     

     

  • See, I told you I'm incurably interested in this.   Yada, yada, yada, blah, blah, blah....

    Yeremyah said, "Patience is the key, learning something new, it's about patience and growth."

    This comment seems to hit the nail on the head.  This  is all about motivation management.   Typically we look at such learning as an intellectual exercise, but really it's an emotional challenge.

    Your comment suggests that the burden of managing these emotions lies with the user, a very normal and understandable way of looking at this. 

    I'm trying to say that a skilled, confident and successful developer will take that burden upon themselves, and to the degree humanly possible, lift that emotional burden off the user.  Why?  Not as a  favor to the user, but because it's in the developer's own self interest.   If a developer can conquer this challenge, if they can lift the emotional burden off the user, it dramatically expands the market for the developer's product.

    I'm convinced that even an app as powerful as Hitfilm could use the divide and conquer strategy to present the  inexperienced user with a series of small learning challenges which are easily mastered, giving the  user many success experiences, keeping the motivation  flowing.

    But this seems to be a quite valuable service which probably shouldn't be given away for free.  I'd be wary of giving all the work involved in crafting such a quality  experience away for free in the vague hope that maybe someday the inexperienced user will buy something.

     

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator

    @PhilTanny first, good discussion. 

    So the Hitfilm team does try to go back and do beginner level tutorials with each revision, but they also have to balance that with new information, rather than endlessly cycling the "basic editing" tutorials--else they'd lose long-term viewers. The official channel is pretty scattershot between Q&A, general film advice (like occasional tutorials on, say, setting up a greenscreen, or lighting tips), the "cool movie effects" and basic software information. I know they put a fair amount of thought into these things, but striking a balance is difficult. 

    Most other Hitfilm tutorial channels are also a scattershot batch of specific effects or general hints. Lots of good information out there, but, sometimes finding specific tips is searching for a needle in a haystack. 

    I'm attempting to create a pretty comprehensive beginning to end course, and I planned my curriculum order for well over a year before beginning. Obviously, at least for you, there are areas missed or that could be improved. 

    I will state some of the later videos in Essential Hitfilm do take steps back then move forward again. For example, a brief discussion of how classic cel animation would be done and how a Composite workflow ties directly back to these methods. Early episodes were "overviews" to try to bring people up to speed on a massive amount of info. Later episodes are getting quite in depth into background theory before getting into execution. There's a reason "Animate Everything" is in three parts. 

    So, if you can articulate what you still feel you need to learn, I may know specific tutorials that cover those topics, or, if not, maybe I'll jump in. Would a "basic terminology tutorial" help? This is a pixel, these are layer dimensions and how they work, here's what you need to know about frame rate, this is what slip, slide, trim mean, etc? 

    The Hitfilm team, other tutorial creators and myself all want to help complete beginners. Heck, much of our user base consists of pre teens cutting game videos and backyard skits, or retirees who want to have fun making videos with the grandkids, and those are certainly two groups entering with no knowledge. 

    FXHOME CEO Josh Davies would love for Hitfilm to spread to first timers. The Hitfilm goal is to bring advanced editing effects to everyone who wants them, but, video/film is a rather complex art form and this type of software has a power-customization-simplicity triangle, and, like good-fast-cheap,  you can only have two. Hitfilm has pushed deep into power and customization while still maintaining a higher level of simplicity than its rivals (trust me, Hitfilm is easier to navigate than Ae and Boris RED). 

    Last Hit-U side note. Like you, I tend to download tutorials to watch. I cheerfully admit to erring on the side of infodump overload, but, when streaming from YouTube on a computer all an episode's chapters have hotlinks in the description in an attempt to make it possible to easily find a specific topic in an episode. Closest I could come to an index without just splitting every subtopic into a horrible list of dozens of videos. 

    I think a problem with online tutorials is limited indexing. I'm more of a book guy, myself. 

    Now I'll share, publicly, for the first time, some long-term Hit-U goals. 

    I'm hoping to get enough audience to eventually aim for sponsorship and/or Patreon subscribers. Enough to afford self-hosting or Vimeo Pro. That way I'd be able to re-upload video revisions, so I could keep a focused list of Essential Hitfilm episodes, optimally organized.  I hope to be able to upload a new version of a video to account for software changes or me figuring out better explanations, without losing view count. 

    On YouTube, view count matters for coming up higher in search results, which helps attract an audience, etc... 

     

  • Triem, thanks again for an intelligent discussion, and all the hard work you are investing in helping Hitfilm users.  Sincerely.

    I like your concept of creating a comprehensive course, and agree that on almost any topic, YouTube is full of "scattershot" videos which are useful for experienced users, but pretty confusing for those just getting started. 

    Personally, my little vote is that your series appears to be excellent for the experienced user who is moving to Hitfilm, so I don't see a need to change it.   My point is only that it's not really that suitable for true beginners. 

    It's interesting to me that the Hitfilm leaders want to target true video editing beginners, and it interests me to try to contribute to that project if possible. 

    As I've tried to explain, I believe a solution lies in the process of dividing the big pile of information (and complex interface) up in to a series of small sequential steps which build logically upon each other.

    As example...

    "Level One" of the interface might present only a timeline and a movie viewer.  You drag and drop clips in to the timeline, drag and drop to rearrange the clips to taste, test your creation in the viewer, and then click export.    That's it.  Nothing more.  

    "Level Two" of the interface might add some basics transitions.  That's it.  Nothing more.

    "Level Three" of the interface might add some basic effects.  That's it. Nothing more.

    Except succeeding level of the interface/tutorial adds just one thing at a time, at least in the beginning. 

    For each level of the interface, there might be a tutorial video specifically about that level available from a help button.

    And so on.  Each new lesson and interface represents a small challenge, so a steady stream of success experiences are provided to the user. That's where the action is, managing motivation.  So long as the new user is experiencing success regularly, they'll be willing to continue, and their confidence will grow over time.

    Each new lesson uses information learned in the previous steps, and nothing  else.   

    As the new user progresses up the level ladder the numbering system keeps reminding them of what they've accomplished.  Yesterday I was on level 3, and today I progressed two levels higher to level 5, I'm getting somewhere,  and I can see the progress I'm making in very clear simple terms.  

    The problem with all of the above is that thinking all this through in detail, and creating all these interfaces and tutorials (not to mention testing it all on real newbies) is a lot of work.   Thus, the very first step for the Hitfilm team would be to become really clear about whether it's worth it to them to invest this much work in serving the newbie  market. 

    That's a whole other calculation that I'm less qualified to do. Personally, I would likely suggest that some modest charge be involved to weed out those determined never to pay for anything, but this is clearly debatable.  There are branding and market share issues and other factors which I don't feel qualified to analyze.

    I sense the problem currently may be that such a clear minded bottom line analysis has perhaps not yet been completed.  I get the impression that the Hitfilm team would like newbie users in a vague sort of way, but only if  the newbie comes to them on Hitfilm's terms and surrenders to the Hitfilm expert interface.  That is, if the newbie shoulders the emotional burden of the learning curve.

    If true, there's nothing wrong with that, but such an approach is clearly going to be less effective than meeting the newbie on their own turf. 

    Divide and conquer.

    BTW, my degree was in special ed, teaching very basic life skills to mentally challenged folks.   In such cases, you just don't have the option of tossing a pile of info at the student with the assumption that they'll rise to the occasion and get it.  They just don't have the ability to do that, even if they have ample motivation.   Teaching on such a basic level is a good education for the teacher too, because if  you don't learn how to break the task up in to simple sequential steps, you fail. 

    And then you have to tie their shoes every single day forever.  :-)

     

  • Interesting thread. As Triem said, we do want the software to be accessible to people that are just starting out video editing / VFX. As it has been mentioned above multiple times, video editing is a complex task and making a user interface that both allows experienced users to be efficient and new users to be able to discover how to use features is a challenging task.

    The idea of having different levels of the interface with different options available depending on what level the user is at would however be insanely complicated to implement, test and maintain. I just don't see it happening. In comparison, creating a tutorial on how to edit your first video is much easier.

    What would be good however would be concrete examples explaining what you were trying to do and what confused you. Knowing what questions you were asking yourself and what made you understand or give up would be valuable to us. Sometimes, easy changes can have a big impact but because we use the software every day it seems obvious to us when it isn't in fact for most people. You giving feedback on those specific issues would help us target them specifically (as opposed to saying "it's too complicated") and hopefully after smoothing a few rough edges it would make for a much smoother experience for new users?

  • Hi Cedric,

    Thanks for your reply.  I must say, the Hitfilm team is VERY accessible.  I'm impressed by that, truly I am.  I hope I'm typing something in my "Yet Another Whiny Newbie" series of posts that is worth your time.  :-)

    Let's see....  

     

    INTERFACE OPTIONS

    I see that Hitfilm already has a variety of interface options available from an easy to access menu.  So, from that it seems reasonable to presume that one of those interface options could be, for instance, a "level one" starter interface containing only a timeline and a video playback viewer.   A "level two" starter interface might add the effects and transitions panel to the timeline/viewer, while still blocking out everything else.   Don't you already have the coding in place to show/hide particular sections of the interface? 

    I honestly don't understand why it's so hard to also serve the expert users with the same software.  Wouldn't you just have an interface option called "expert interface" which showed all interface panels and provide ready access to all features?

    I don't think Hitfilm is "too complicated".   I think it's organized and presented for experienced users, and not video editing new comers.  I'm attempting to address the challenge of it becoming flexible enough to serve both groups at the same time.  

    I take no offense at all if some or all of this is unworkable for reasons I'm not in a position to understand.  I'm just trying to be useful in the only way I know how, and it's of course up to you to decide the degree to which I'm succeeding.  I'm not attached to anybody agreeing, I'm just an incurable typoholic, that's all.  :-)

     

    OBSTACLE

    Moving along, in response to your request, here's what's likely to make me give up. 

    I just discovered today that Hitfilm can not reliably import .mov files, including apparently the vast majority of files I am working with.  In other words, Hitfilm is not a real Mac app.   This thread, where I hath belched an ornery complaint....

    https://hitfilm.com/forum/discussion/4343/cant-import-mov-files

    ... suggests the problem has been known and not successfully addressed for at least a few years now, which suggests there is limited interest in Hitfilm becoming a real Mac app.   Discouraging, I must admit. 

    Thus, to be honest, my main interest in Hitfilm now is this forum, the nice people here, and the interesting discussions like this we are sharing.  Until the mov files issue is finally conquered, I'm regrettably pulling the plug on continuing my Hitfilm education, with sincere regrets.  I've shifted focus today to investigating Adobe Premiere Elements, outcome unknown at this time.

     

    WHAT I'M TRYING TO DO

    For some reason, I seem to be fascinated with making face swapping videos at the moment.  I was trying to do it with Openshot, and having some limited success.  Openshot automatically creates keyframes as you re-position and re-size a video track, so that was good.   But I couldn't get frame by frame advancing to work at all, and unlike Hitfilm, there is no support of any kind (reasonable in a free app like Openshot).

    When I try to research keyframing in Hitfilm via manual and video tutorials, I repeatedly encounter terms and features that are as yet unfamiliar.   So I concluded I should back up and take the entire Hitfilm University video course, so I'm not clogging the forum with lots of stupid questions.  Not a bad plan, except that now my face swapping project which was nearing usefulness in Openshot, is being sidetracked by a major learning  curve operation in Hitfilm.

    All this was basically more or less working out, until I discovered I couldn't reliably import .mov files, and the problem wasn't me.  Now my motivation has largely collapsed.

    So there you have it, way too many words from me as usual, yet another bloated interface!  :-)  Hope a few of these words might prove useful somehow.

     

  • edited August 18

    Stop calling what the Editor does the "Editor Sequence". I know it's 'correct', it's just a horrible phrase. Search for it in Google, top entry: Hitfilm manual.

    "The Editor sequence properties determine the setup of your Editor sequence where you perform the main edit of your movie."

    Under recursive, see recursive... ;)

    http://i854.photobucket.com/albums/ab106/pickaname2/Editor.jpg


  •  @Palacono where is that sentence? I could find it in the old HF2 manual but not in HF2017 manual. http://hitfilm.com/reference-manuals/hitfilm-pro-2017#project.htm

    I'm not convinced removing "sequence" would help new users understand HitFilm better...

  • True, Google only goes to the older manuals, so new users can't find any reference to it at all in the newer manuals. Nothing else in Goggle explains what it means, but it's still used here:
    http://hitfilm.com/reference-manuals/hitfilm-express-2017#navigating_the_editor_timeline.htm?zoom_highlightsub=editor+sequence

    Is there any sentence that would make less sense if you replaced it with just "Editor" or "Editor's timeline?"

    People just edit in an Editor. Probably Composite in a Compositor and Export from an Exporter too. Transcode in a Transcoder and Import in an Importer.

    "Does what it says on the tin" or "K.I.S.S." will repel fewer beginners.

    It's like a tutorial saying : "This is how to best utilise your NLE to construct layered composite shots and export h.264 clips at various FPS, Bit Depths and Bitrates, or .PNG Images sequences (with Alpha channel information), for reimporting into another NLE for further processing"

    Beginner says "Wha...????" followed by "Bye!"

  • I think Editor sequence is probably a good term for Hitfilm to use. The Hitfilm NLE should support sequences as the term is used in apps like Premiere, Resolve and others. By that I mean multiple sequences. Right now Hitfilm only supports one sequence.

    The word timeline is probably more obvious to the average Joe than sequence.

  • You have to learn to fly a plane via external classes/resources. A planes UI can never help you here. I submit that compositing fits into this metaphor and to a lesser extent NLE editing.

    The Hitfilm UI is quite simple compared to other top/capable software out there and yet Hitfilm is still very capable. I'm not sure how the "level one" and "level two" simplifies things. How is the fact that level one does not have transitions any simpler than level two that does. Is it about 10 features is more complex than 5. It is easy to ignore things. If there are 5 things I want to use I can easily ignore the other million features. That's me. If a few extra features available in the UI spins someone's head then how far are they really going to go in edit/compositing. The concept curve beyond basic NLE edits gets steep wicked fast. 

    Still a version or two ago Sony did a "simplified" user interface to their low end Vegas Movie studio software so somebody thinks simplification was useful to spend time/money on. They still kept the "classic" UI as well. Vegas/Movie Studio is an app that has a gazillion menus, toolbars and track header buttons and the simplification focused a lot on removing those. Nothing like a level 1/2/3 concept. They did add wizards. While you can wizard NLE tasks I don't think it's as near applicable to compositing tasks.

    Video editor software vendors are not in the business of teaching video editing or video compositing. They usually have videos that cover the basic use of their specific implementation of various editing concepts/features. That is about as close as vendors get to "teaching" editing. I think there is a different focus in a tutorial that is teaching verses showing the features of the app.

    One problem here is teaching of generic concepts. It does not really exist. A class/book/TUT is always focused on a single program. There is probably a "Dummies" book on Adobe Premiere, After Effects, FCPX. Not so for Hitfilm. However, once concepts are learned they usually mostly transfer to other apps. 

    FxHome has a number of TUTs on basic editing function. Your first project, or Project One. They are scattered over time and maybe hard to find. FxHome could probably do with redoing these handful of basic edit/project teaching videos using all they have learned over the years. Better organized and laid out. There is a lot of flotsam on the Hitfilm Youtube channel. Unfocused mishmash. Wading through that is not going to be fun for a new user. It needs to be trimmed.

    Let's say FxHome redid a focused project creation, import, edit, trim, grade, export TUT series. Now the next version of Hitfilm supports multiple editor sequences. Re-edit the editor timeline video in that series, inserting the new sequence feature use, and dump the previous one. An editor TUT would talk about multiple tracks and how to use them to organize your editor timeline. Well, multiple sequences are all about timeline organization. Keep the series focused to help the new user. Patching in new videos of new features does not keep a totally newto edit user focused by walking them through a workflow. Sexy VFX tutorials are always standalone so that is easy.

    "What would be good however would be concrete examples explaining what you were trying to do and what confused you."

    +1

  • Hi Cedric,

    Thanks for your reply.  I must say, the Hitfilm team is VERY accessible.  I'm impressed by that, truly I am.  I hope I'm typing something in my "Yet Another Whiny Newbie" series of posts that is worth your time.  :-)

    Let's see....  

     

    INTERFACE OPTIONS

    I see that Hitfilm already has a variety of interface options available from an easy to access menu.  So, from that it seems reasonable to presume that one of those interface options could be, for instance, a "level one" starter interface containing only a timeline and a video playback viewer.   A "level two" starter interface might add the effects and transitions panel to the timeline/viewer, while still blocking out everything else.   Don't you already have the coding in place to show/hide particular sections of the interface? 

    I honestly don't understand why it's so hard to also serve the expert users with the same software.  Wouldn't you just have an interface option called "expert interface" which showed all interface panels and provide ready access to all features?

    I don't think Hitfilm is "too complicated".   I think it's organized and presented for experienced users, and not video editing new comers.  I'm attempting to address the challenge of it becoming flexible enough to serve both groups at the same time.  

    I take no offense at all if some or all of this is unworkable for reasons I'm not in a position to understand.  I'm just trying to be useful in the only way I know how, and it's of course up to you to decide the degree to which I'm succeeding.  I'm not attached to anybody agreeing, I'm just an incurable typoholic, that's all.  :-)

     

    OBSTACLE

    Moving along, in response to your request, here's what's likely to make me give up. 

    I just discovered today that Hitfilm can not reliably import .mov files, including apparently the vast majority of files I am working with.  In other words, Hitfilm is not a real Mac app.   This thread, where I hath belched an ornery complaint....

    https://hitfilm.com/forum/discussion/4343/cant-import-mov-files

    ... suggests the problem has been known and not successfully addressed for at least a few years now, which suggests there is limited interest in Hitfilm becoming a real Mac app.   Discouraging, I must admit. 

    Thus, to be honest, my main interest in Hitfilm now is this forum, the nice people here, and the interesting discussions like this we are sharing.  Until the mov files issue is finally conquered, I'm regrettably pulling the plug on continuing my Hitfilm education, with sincere regrets.  I've shifted focus today to investigating Adobe Premiere Elements, outcome unknown at this time.

     

    WHAT I'M TRYING TO DO

    For some reason, I seem to be fascinated with making face swapping videos at the moment.  I was trying to do it with Openshot, and having some limited success.  Openshot automatically creates keyframes as you re-position and re-size a video track, so that was good.   But I couldn't get frame by frame advancing to work at all, and unlike Hitfilm, there is no support of any kind (reasonable in a free app like Openshot).

    When I try to research keyframing in Hitfilm via manual and video tutorials, I repeatedly encounter terms and features that are as yet unfamiliar.   So I concluded I should back up and take the entire Hitfilm University video course, so I'm not clogging the forum with lots of stupid questions.  Not a bad plan, except that now my face swapping project which was nearing usefulness in Openshot, is being sidetracked by a major learning  curve operation in Hitfilm.

    All this was basically more or less working out, until I discovered I couldn't reliably import .mov files, and the problem wasn't me.  Now my motivation has largely collapsed.

    So there you have it, way too many words from me as usual, yet another bloated interface!  :-)  Hope a few of these words might prove useful somehow.

     

  • Ok, so another way to skin the cat could be to leave Express just as it is, as a featured limited free trial of Hitfilm Pro.  Instead of messing with what already works for the more experienced users, you could create a new entry level app which competes directly with programs like iMovie.  This would just be Express with a bunch of the more advanced stuff hidden. 

    As I'm sure you know, Apple has done a pretty good job of trashing the once great iMovie brand.  If you go to their own Mac App Store, most of the comments from users are complaints and nostalgic pining for the good old days.  Apple seems to have a bit of a gift for creating great stuff, and then "improving it" to death.

    Other apps from other companies have attempted to seize the opportunity to serve the iMovie type user.   As best I can tell, nobody has quite nailed it yet, so perhaps there is an opportunity still available.

    If so, then your own version of iMovie could be the free entry level app which gets folks in the door of your sales chain and helps build your brand etc.   Perhaps you could then start charging for Express at some price point below Pro?  It could still have a free trial period of course.

    Or, maybe newbies aren't really worth all this bother.   Could be that too.  :-)

     

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