Stabilizing Footage

In a shaky shot of a field I've taken, I need to stabilize it so I can add a couple of effects. How can I do this with hitfilm?

Comments

  • Add a new 2-point tracker, track two points in the footage that are as far away from each other as possible and apply the track with Purpose: Stabilize.
  • How do I set the purpose for the track?
  • In the Track Panel, you have two Steps, "Track your points" and "Apply to layer". In the second step there is a drop-down labeled "Purpose:", and instead of "Transform" you'll want to set it to "Stabilize". Make sure you check all the boxes underneath it if you also want to stabilize the rotation and scale of the frame.
  • Thank you. This was a major problem with my next video. While filming a commercial for our golf team, another player took a practice swing behind me and hit me in the head, so there was a slight shake in the footage.
  • Please give a report back on that. I do a little tweak on shaky footage sometimes to help the stabilizer, if needed.:-)
  • Honestly, the videos not going to look good. It's stable, but im working with an iphone camera, and no other equipment.
  • Also, how do I get rid of the black ring around the film, after stabilizing it.
  • Just scale the footage up and maybe move it slightly until the ring doesn't disappear anymore.
  • edited April 2012
    Oh, up above it says "slight shake", hahaha, software stabilizers will not work well if the repaired footage has to assume the same pixel dimensions.
    The only way to make it fit the original is to use "zooming" and then you get the "jello" effect, which is worse than cropping.
    If you can play it at crop size, you're better off. This is done quite often on TV, so it's not weird.
    If you're going to upsample it, I would do that to the whole clip first, then stabilize it, then crop it down to original. That way the whole think looks uniform.
    So the way that would work is to SCALE down the good footage, and CROP the stabilized part, get it? Read that again and think about it.:)
    Imagine a 720p rectangle overlayed on a 1080p clip. The rectangle is your target pixel aspect ratio.
    As you scrub along, the stabilized frames will pass by, and you want to crop them into the rectangle. There should be adequate clearance from the rough edges or rings, or whatever.
  • "Thank you. This was a major problem with my next video. While filming a commercial for our golf team, another player took a practice swing behind me and hit me in the head, so there was a slight shake in the footage" - That is amazing. Some one hit you in the head with a golf club .... and there was only SLIGHT SHAKE? Sir. You have won film points!

  • Oh, up above it says "slight shake", hahaha, software stabilizers will not work well if the repaired footage has to assume the same pixel dimensions.
    The only way to make it fit the original is to use "zooming" and then you get the "jello" effect, which is worse than cropping.
    If you can play it at crop size, you're better off. This is done quite often on TV, so it's not weird.
    If you're going to upsample it, I would do that to the whole clip first, then stabilize it, then crop it down to original. That way the whole think looks uniform.
    So the way that would work is to SCALE down the good footage, and CROP the stabilized part, get it? Read that again and think about it.:)
    Imagine a 720p rectangle overlayed on a 1080p clip. The rectangle is your target pixel aspect ratio.
    As you scrub along, the stabilized frames will pass by, and you want to crop them into the rectangle. There should be adequate clearance from the rough edges or rings, or whatever.

    I've ALMOST wrapped my brain around this. Could you please explain a little bit more of this very cool concept.
  • Basically, the idea is to increase the scale of the footage so that the wandering edges are outside of the final frame area. Budwzr is recommending that you perform the scale first, before tracking. That way, when you crop down again to the final frame area, the edges aren't visible.
  • Axel wilkinson summed it up pretty nice, thank you, and to Morgan, when I'm in the zone it takes a little more than a club to take me down(; lol
  • I'm going to reshoot the video because the whole thing was just a wreck. Hopefully it'll be back up Ina week or 2.
  • edited May 2012

    I'm going to reshoot the video because the whole thing was just a wreck. Hopefully it'll be back up Ina week or 2.

    Well that's "par for the course". :) That's what I usually end up doing too. These stabilizers don't work well unless it's a minor nuisance type jiggling.
    If it's anything against the plain sky though, they work great.
  • Ok thanks guys, some concepts I may use in the future. :D
  • edited May 2012

    Ok thanks guys, some concepts I may use in the future. :D

    There's some more variables that I didn't go into because it gets a bit tedious, but like Axel said, the basic idea in repair work is to inflate the material first to get a finer quantization in the spatial axis.
    Hahaha, that word itself is a bit hairy, yes? The spellchecker red-lines it too. Hahaha.
  • I know it's an old thread but I have a question and hopefully someone can help. I tried to stabilize a shot taken with mobile phone want to use it for education. So I stabilized it and got an very visible jello effect.

    I tacked, stabilized and than zoomed to stablized footage to fit into the Screen. Does it bring better results to first scale it and than crop it?

    And if so, how do i do it in Hitfilm? I suggest upscaling a footage inside a comp, embedding that com into another and tracking it there. But comps cannot be tracked, right? So do I Need to Export that scaling as an intermediate footage and Import that one for tracking?

  • If you have jello, then there is nothing more Hitfilm can do for your footage. As you have found, once you stabilise your shot the jello that was always there becomes more obvious.

    ProDad do the Mercalli range of stabilising software that specifically deals with jello. It tracks the image contents and squashes and stretches the image in the opposite direction to the jello to counteract it.  There are demo versions with watermarks, demos with no watermark but limited length, and cheap versions with fewer features, so you can check them out and see what suits your budget or needs.

  • @Juda1 @Palacono has made an error.

    Hitfilm Express has a "Rolling Shutter" add-on designed to reduce "Jell-O(tm)" artifacts. It can be purchased as part of the "Repair Pack" add-on in the Hitfilm Store.

    https://hitfilm.com/store/hitfilm-express

    Rolling Shutter is included in Hitfilm Pro.

    I haven't done a direct comparison, but wouldn't be surprised if Mercalli did a better job than the Hitfilm version, but the Repair pack also has other useful filters in it.

  • Oops, I forgot about that one. :) I didn't have much success with it because I had no idea what the settings were going to adjust and it was quite processor intensive on my system. Skew removal worked OK, but maybe my footage was too far gone to get a good result with vertical squash'n'stretch removal. Maybe you'll have better luck.

    The Denoise Effect included in the Repair Pack is a lot better than any others I've used, so that's something to consider too. Here's the relevant section from the manual.  You could check it out on your footage with a demo of Hitfilm Pro - export is disabled.

    Rolling shutter

    Some capture methods used by video cameras produce an effect called rolling shutter. This is particularly common with DSLR cameras. Rolling shutter can be identified by a wobbling, jelly-like instability in the frame during rapid movement.

    The rolling shutter effect is designed to counteract rolling shutter, correcting the video and minimizing the effects of rolling shutter.

    Shutter direction is used to define whether the camera uses a vertical or horizontal shutter. Consult your camera's specifications for more information.

    Correction

    The correction property is used to specify the amount of time it takes for the camera's shutter to travel across the frame.

    In the case of cameras using a vertical shutter, this is defined as the time it takes in frames to capture from the top row of the image to the bottom row.

    Positive values indicates the vertical shutter is travelling from top to bottom, while negative values are for bottom to top. You should consult the specifications of your camera to find the correction value to use.

    Shutter sync

    This property determines which part of the rolling shutter frame should be used to fix the image.

    -0.5 will use the frame at the beginning of the vertical shutter capture, as defined by the correction property.
    0.0 will use the frame halfway through the vertical shutter capture. This is usually best as it will result in the minimum amount of distortion.
    0.5 will use the frame at the end of the vertical shutter capture, as defined by the correction property.

    Optical flow

    Rolling shutter works by tracking the movement of every pixel in the frame using optical flow techniques.

    The View menu can be used to observe the accuracy of the optical flow track.

    Different videos may require adjustments to the optical flow properties. Adjusting the Window size and Sigma properties tend to yield the best results.



  • @Palacono, I remembered it was there, but didn't remember what it was called. I was poking around in pro for five minutes before it occured to me to check the Repair Pack on the Store.

    @Juda1 I agree with Palacono. The Video Noise Reducer in the Repair add-on (and Pro) is as good as NEAT Video, which is a commercial plug-in costing between $75 and $250(!) depending on the version. NEAT Video is the best I've ever used and has been my noise reducer of choice for a decade. Saying Hitfilm's is as good (maybe better!) is very high praise.

Sign in to comment

Leave a Comment