DSLR dudes, check this out

edited October 2011 in Filmmaking
Many of you are likely up to speed with the fact that Canon's next DSLR is the 1DX, and it sounds awesome. Full frame sensor, "enhanced" video (less aliasing and moiré, apparently), and 14fps JPEG mode. That's 18MP JPEGS, by the way. All for the low low price of... about seven grand.
This video demonstrates the 14fps JPEG mode:
http://youtu.be/bYxsi1L5cRM
Not only is it pretty crazy that this even works, but just imagine the next iteration of this. Future DSLRs will no doubt move toward mirrorless global shutters, and with processors getting faster and faster, I'm sure we'll be seeing cameras that shoot 24fps (or more) at 18MP (or more) in the very near future. And even if not, the 1DX is a pretty sweet piece of gear.
More info on the camera here.

Comments

  • Almost posted this myself, the ISO settings are crazy (50 - 204,800) combined with the improved video and that full frame sensor this is finally a 1D that is actually worth it's higher price (around £4800).
    I'd like to see some footage filmed on the 1D-X, so i'm looking forward to the comparative tests people will stick this through; I have to say i'm also kind of disappointed, the 1D series has always been aimed at sports photography so it's unfortunate they didn't push higher frame rates on the 1080p setting, i would have liked at least a 50/60p setting.
    I think the next announcement from canon is a s35 chipped camera, maybe the Nov 3rd announcement is a new version of the 5D which we'll see some of these video settings ported into, and possibly more added? well i could dream.
  • Nice! Although completely impractical for me given its price point. I could really only justify this if I was doing some professional photography work as well.
    Definitely interesting to see the camera/video markets developing. At the moment it feels like they're kinda grating against each other and pretending that the other doesn't exist (which is particularly strange when the manufacturers make both video cameras AND DSLRs). I wonder whether at some point the market will coalesce into a single 'camera' category that does everything, to varying degrees, or whether the photo/video split will remain?
  • No mention whatsoever of the most pressing issue for me personally, which is whether auto-focus has been implemented for video. I suspect that no, it hasn't. I use my 7D a fair bit for video, and the feature that would be most useful for me is easily auto-focus. Improvements in aliasing and moire are good, sure, but those have never been problems for me. So this is a exciting announcement because Canon has finally brought out a new video-capable DSLR, but less exciting because at $7k there's no chance I'll ever even consider getting one.
  • Pretty cool to see this. I'm not that fond of the size of the 1Ds.

    Not only is it pretty crazy that this even works, but just imagine the next iteration of this. Future DSLRs will no doubt move toward mirrorless global shutters, and with processors getting faster and faster, I'm sure we'll be seeing cameras that shoot 24fps (or more) at 18MP (or more) in the very near future.

    One day, we are going to look back and say, "Remember rolling shutter? Man, how did we ever put up with that?!"

  • No mention whatsoever of the most pressing issue for me personally, which is whether auto-focus has been implemented for video. I suspect that no, it hasn't. I use my 7D a fair bit for video, and the feature that would be most useful for me is easily auto-focus. Improvements in aliasing and moire are good, sure, but those have never been problems for me. So this is a exciting announcement because Canon has finally brought out a new video-capable DSLR, but less exciting because at $7k there's no chance I'll ever even consider getting one.

    Thank you, Axel! I agree 100%. I've avoided buying a Canon for this one reason. The minute they make an EF-Mount DSLR that does auto-focus while shooting video, I'll be first in line to buy it.
    I feel like most videographers look down their pointed little noses at anyone that even mentions auto-focus, so I've just stopped talking about it, and avoiding Canon cameras. So it's nice to see someone else finally mention this problem.
  • Yeh, while lack of auto-focus isn't a problem for most narrative filmmaking, if you're doing documentary work or anything more casual it must be a bit of a faff. While this new camera is cool, it still highlights that Canon are making stills cameras which happen to have cool video features - they're still not seeing these cameras as being used extensively for video, even if that's how we all see them.
  • Indeed. As you mention Simon, for narrative stuff I prefer the manual focus anyway, but when shooting events or just grabbing quick videos for YouTube or the like, I just can't use the 7D, and have to resort to a proper video camera. I reckon with a $7k price tag, they figure the guys using this are going to be more pro-oriented, and that's probably true, but it does point toward the situation Simon mentions, where Canon clearly aren't viewing these cameras as video cameras yet.
    I wonder if they realize how many cameras they would sell if they took the exact same innards, and wrapped a proper video camera body around them? Just change the shape of the body, market it as a new camera, for video, and they would sell loads, I'm sure. Especially if they added auto-focus. That applies less for the 1Dx, I suppose, due to price, but if they did that with the 60D or the Rebel...
  • edited October 2011
    [quote name='Simon K Jones']Yeh, while lack of auto-focus isn't a problem for most narrative filmmaking, if you're doing documentary work or anything more casual it must be a bit of a faff. While this new camera is cool, it still highlights that Canon are making stills cameras which happen to have cool video features - they're still not seeing these cameras as being used extensively for video, even if that's how we all see them.[/quote]
    [quote name='Axel Wilkinson']I wonder if they realize how many cameras they would sell if they took the exact same innards, and wrapped a proper video camera body around them? Just change the shape of the body, market it as a new camera, for video, and they would sell loads, I'm sure. Especially if they added auto-focus. That applies less for the 1Dx, I suppose, due to price, but if they did that with the 60D or the Rebel...
    [/quote]
    They're still working out the kinks with video. All DSLR manufacturers are. I can see this exact situation happening in the next few years. Auto focus is a big deal, and I'm sure they haven't just forgotten to implement it. It works wonderfully for stills, but for video on these cameras, I'm sure it's far more complicated than it seems. They want to make sure it's implemented well. Since I bought my T2i last year, I've been looking at each new camera as baby steps toward the future of video. Sony have the NEX-FS100 which is very close to what you're describing, and I feel confident that once Canon work out the issues with video (including auto-focus), we're going to see something very impressive from them.
    It's true that Canon is still aiming their DSLR line toward photographers, but the fact that they have implemented video into them at all tells me that they have a plan for that feature. If they only wanted to sell DSLRs as still cameras, they wouldn't have introduced video capabilities in the first place, at least not as prominently as they have. They know videographers want a killer video camera from them, and eventually we're going to get it. That's the whole reason I posted this thread; to discuss the future of these things, and what we want to see from them, using the 1Dx as an example of their progress.
  • I took my new T3i to my niece's wedding to be a supplemental backup to the hired photographer. The stills and most of the video turned out great. But several of the video shots I took ended up being out of focus.
    I now have a chart for the hyper-focal lengths for my zoom lens (the kit lens). For quick shots like I was doing in the future, I'll just set my zoom and get the hyper focal distance from my chart (gotta get it memorized).
  • Auto focus is a big deal, and I'm sure they haven't just forgotten to implement it. It works wonderfully for stills, but for video on these cameras, I'm sure it's far more complicated than it seems.

    The trouble is that the mirror is required for auto-focus on a DSLR, and for video, the mirror has to be locked up. So an entirely new system has to be developed. And I'm sure they are working on breaking down that wall, as you say.
  • For seven grand? Ha . No. I could buy JVC GY-HM750 ProHD Camcorder for less than that.
  • Yes, but the JVC isn't going to touch the 1Dx's image quality, DOF abilities, or low light performance, and it requires proprietary lenses be purchased. Also, its not going to be a great stills camera, which let's not forget, is the primary function of the 1Dx. Which isn't to say that the JVC isn't a good camera, or that it doesn't have some advantages over the Canon in other areas. But in all of the areas which make the Canon HDDSLR's great for video in the first place, the JVC won't even come close.

  • For seven grand? Ha . No. I could buy JVC GY-HM750 ProHD Camcorder for less than that.

    having used this camera (or one of it's close variants) on various productions, I'd rather have the 1D X, the JVC is all fine for documentary and studio work, but the 1D as Axel said, has far more options and as far as my experiences go, the image quality on DSLR's is much better.
    Maybe that's just because of my filming preferences, i don't like studio work, and the JVC, due to it's bulky size isn't always ideal for getting in tight places or for quick filming.

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