low quality blurry footage canon 600d

Hi wondering if anyone can help. A while back I got myself a canon 600d have done some test footage and it was crisp and clear today I tried it out again. and in hit film it just kind of looks low quality and blotchy. any ideas?
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  • Hi wondering if anyone can help. A while back I got myself a canon 600d have done some test footage and it was crisp and clear today I tried it out again. and in hit film it just kind of looks low quality and blotchy. any ideas?

    Hi,
    Could you post a screenshot?
    Thanks
    Ady
  • it wont let me post the photo says file to big i used export frame on hitfilm. and the editor here says im already using 333.92k how do i clear that. I am using two softcel lights they both have 2 diffusers. i think thats the right word. could that be causing the problem?
  • edited October 2011
    http://youtu.be/Rg6bv4ToUig looks rather blothcy on full screen. could it be the lights?
  • AdyAdy Staff
    edited October 2011

    it wont let me post the photo says file to big i used export frame on hitfilm. and the editor here says im already using 333.92k how do i clear that. I am using two softcel lights they both have 2 diffusers. i think thats the right word. could that be causing the problem?

    Hi,
    In order to remove attachments you must go to your Account > Settings > Attachments. Here you can remove the ones you no longer need, this will mean you regain some space back for uploads.
    EDIT: The video you have attached is set to Private, I can't view it.
    Thanks
    Ady
  • should be viewable now just didnt want it viewable to everyone
  • We've just upped the limit on attachments, you should now be able to attach 10MB in total.
  • edited October 2011
    Cheers Daniel I have posted a video instead. Im fliming a cloning scene me 1 with a beard, and me 2 without. I shot on the 600d in the garden it was great. I dont know what causing the problem eher cant see any settings on the camera that would sort the problem. maybe its the positioning of the lights or the fact they have 2 diffusers a white sheet inside the softbox infront of the light and oneon the lid of the box. Maybe i need to have more light and remove the diffusers? or maybe i did get a setting wrong on the camera?
  • well as far as i can tell from the video and image, the footage is incorrectly white balanced so your greenscreen looks more blue than green, the ISO is probably set too high which is causing very noticeable noise. the main issue here is the lens isn't focused, you might not have adjusted lens to the correct focal point or maybe you have the wrong f.
    I'm assuming you are just using the kit lens so maybe the auto focus switch on the lens is switched on.
    those are the camera related issues that come to mind; I'd be very surprised if you managed to get a decent key with that white balance setting and all that noise, so If it is just one or a few of these camera mistakes i mentioned i'd suggest reshooting.
  • Well that video certainly doesn't look 1080p. Even though it's still compressed on youtube it shouldn't look that poor. It looks to me like that is SD footage.
    There's some noise on the video which may be down to the export, or could be the need for more lighting but the image is far too soft.
    What video format are you working with? I'd recommend trying an AVI version if not already. Also, double check that you've set the project up as an HD project. If you're using an HD file inside an SD project the video probably won't look great as it's played back and downscaled in realtime.
    I'm just stabbing at this a bit so may be way off. To me though that footage looks a bit noisy but doesn't look HD at all.
  • Thanks Strike em. what level should the iso be set at/white balance. before i just had a sony handycam. its all alien to me. it was the 18-55 mm lens kit included. i think its a combination of lighting and i think ive messed with settings i shouldnt have like the iso.
    nutty banana (unless ive knocked the setting, highly likely) it should have been set to raw footage.
    cheers guys going to try again tomorrow
  • strike em? should autofocus be off?
  • Can anyone recommend the best iso settings (which yes i think caused all the noise) white exposure etc
  • edited October 2011
    This is pretty common for people jumping onto the DSLR filming from handycams, ISO, f stops and picking the right lens was alien to me when I was transitioning (although i had experience with studio cameras).
    if you are filming on your DSLR turning autofocus is highly recommended, a manual focus always give you better results and will look more professional.
    the ISO should be judged on the amount of light in the room, if shooting outside in the middle of the day an ISO in the range of 100 - 800 should be sufficient (lower ISO = less noise) of course you can't always have a really low ISO setting if you're shooting at night so you need to take several factors into consideration (your f stops, i.e. 1.8, 2.0, 2.8 - the lower the f. = better low light capability but also more bokeh/DOF)

    I'm going to link you to a DSLR basic training series on vimeo, it should help you understand how to get better results, and to save yourself looking like a idiot if i get something wrong...
    dslr training
    also www.philipbloom.net the guy who ran the training series, he's got loads of great tips and knowledge of DSLR shooting.
    hope this helps.
  • wow cool i was just looking at a partial online manual of the 600d. If i set iso to auto will that be better. i think it was set way high. and i think the focus was on auto. Cheers again
  • Don't set the ISO to auto, I know coming from the handycam the auto settings are familiar and easy but it doesn't take much to learn which setting works best, the 600d only has about 5 settings to try, so just see what they look like with the lighting rig set up. do the same for your white balance - what i used to do when i had the 550d was take a photo with a a white sheet (could be paper or something) then go onto the menu and use the white balance from the photo.

    I'd also suggest editing one of the preset picture styles, reduce the saturation. contrast and sharpness - the image might not pop as much on the camera screen but it helps in post.
  • cheers Ill set it to the lowest setting for the iso and work my way up. and ill follow your white balance suggestion too. thanks again.
    today was only a test run. good job two as to play the second character i need to shave my beard off lol
  • Strike em. Ive just watched all the tuturials from the link. Thankyou very much for that there were somevery useful tips such as how to set everything up for filming like lowering contrast and saturation etc. Thanks again. I'm glad I got it wrong to gain this input thanks.
  • Well thanks to everyones advice it all went fine.
  • That still doesn't look quite right too me, did you grade it in post? as the jacket looks really blue and the skin tones look unnaturally orange. Your focus is still off too, if you're having difficulties judging the focus distance, just get a tape measure and work with that if you know you are going to be X distance away from the camera but don't have anyone to stand in for you.
    If your white balance is off - this is working with the images on here - i'd guess you need to change the WB to something like 'daylight' 'tungsten' or 'white Florissant' but i might be off as i personally don't use presets.
    I'm far from a pro with blue/green screen, but heres a shot from the only thing i've ever filmed against a bluescreen
    [attachment=125:Rob shot.jpg]
    The person is clear and sharp, although the lighting is off, the background matches in it's colour style
    Video
    the colour grade is somewhat inconsistent, but this was a rush job i admit.
    I think you just need to spend a good few days getting used to the camera and all the settings available, at the end of the day i'm not in the room with you so i can't tell you the exact settings you need as the image you take on your camera could be brighter than what it really is.
    really put your camera to the test, find out what ISO setting is 'too noisey' get an understanding of the f stops and play about with the focus
  • Hi,
    I lowered the ISO followed the instructions in Phillip Bloom videos to get the default settings best for Film, that he advised. Ive never used lighting befoer. Id usually just put the green screen in the garden. Whiet balance used tungsten. I did do some grading but it was by no means perfect. point of the photo was I got a key and I coulndt get anything yesterday and the iso advice really helped with the quality that and many other things such as repositioning the lights not using diffusers. I cant grow the beard back but may be able to make it work with grading.
    I'm still not sure how to deal with the foucs I just set it to manual and tried not to mess with the lens.
    I do tend to rush things but allegedly this is due to dyspraxia lol which Im not sure I can spell but only just found out I had. Gotta love the education system.
    I used chroma UV blur and other things just experimented really. but it keyed. hence photo and its hasnt so much noise.
  • I could always post an ungraded version of that picture?
  • This is scaled down but basicallu unkeyed and ungraded
  • Hi madmike,
    As has already been mentioned in the thread, the main problem is that your subject is out-of-focus. The good news is that the problem is easy to fix, the bad news is that gaining a deeper understanding of focus can take a little while!
    I would highly recommend that you start by reading up on cameras and lenses, so you have a better idea how they work and how you can get the results you want. This is a great introduction to shooting still photographs with a DSLR, and most of the information it contains is directly transferable to shooting video with one too. Pay particular attention to the section on aperture, and definitely read the related article on depth-of-field.
    The quick fix for your problem is to make sure that your lens is set to manual focus, and then twist the focus ring on the lens until the subject appears sharp in the viewfinder. If you're filming yourself, put a placeholder item (like a chair or something) exactly where you'll stand and use that as a focus target, before moving it out of the way and filming yourself.
    The slightly longer fix is to switch your camera over to aperture priority mode (Av on the function wheel) and increase your f-stop until you get a large enough depth-of-field to contain your subject and their movement (f8 might be a good place to start). However, increasing your f-stop means that you're also reducing the amount of light that you're letting into the camera. This normally requires an increase your camera's ISO sensitivity setting to maintain an acceptable shutter speed. Play around with the f-stop and ISO until you get an acceptable compromise between noise and depth-of-field.
    I apologize for all the technical jargon I've used. If you read the articles I linked to hopefully you'll be able to understand what I'm talking about!
    Good luck! :)
  • When I filmed I took the autofocus off and viewed through the viewfinder in reverse. admittedly I got in wrong and maybe next time ill place a chair where i'll be standing. However the whole focusing issue still baffles me. it looked in focus at the time.

  • When I filmed I took the autofocus off and viewed through the viewfinder in reverse.
    admittedly I got in wrong and maybe next time ill place a chair where i'll be standing.

    One of the cool features on your 600D is that you have a 3-10x digital zoom, which you can use to check your focus without having to faff around with optical zooming. To make use of this feature you'd frame your shot, digitally zoom-in to your focus target (a chair, person or whatever), manually adjust the focus until it's pin-sharp, and then turn-off the digital zoom. You should have a perfectly framed and focused shot.

    However the whole focusing issue still baffles me.

    Read more about it, continue to play around with your camera and most important of all - don't give up! :)
  • is the focus the dial button on the 600d. (I know im sounding thick even by asking, Isnt that the exposure) this is my first dslr the dial seemed to let in more light useful if I have a low iso. I turned off the digital zoom function as I only have a very small space to work in. so if I zoom in too much I want get everything in.
    Admittedly I did see that the optical focus I think thats right wasnt as low as I wanted i.e. at its lowest but I didnt want to change it halfway through what I was doing.
    the project is simple two versions of a character talking with one long shot ie both characters in shot from waist up and then seperate shots.
    OOh and I never give up lol

  • is the focus the dial button on the 600d.

    I'm guessing that you have the 18-55mm kit lens which comes with the 600D? Like every Canon lens which supports auto-focus, it has a switch labelled AF MF, which is the Auto Focus or Manual Focus selector. When you have it switched to MF you can manually control the focus by rotating the small ring surrounding the front of the lens. (I guess you know this, but the larger ring in the middle of the lens is for controlling the zoom.)
    When you say the dial button, I assume that you mean the command dial directly behind the shutter button? The command dial can control different settings depending what mode you're in. In aperture priority mode (Av on the large exposure mode dial) rotating the command dial changes the f-stop (or aperture). The larger the number, the less light that you're letting into the camera.

    I turned off the digital zoom function as I only have a very small space to work in. so if I zoom in too much I want get everything in.

    Like I said in my previous post, the digital zoom is great for ensuring that you have a perfect manual focus. You can switch it back off before you start filming, to ensure that you get the framing you require.

    OOh and I never give up lol

    That's good, because you have an exciting journey ahead of you as you learn all of the fun things you can do with your new camera!
    I'd highly recommend sitting down for an hour or two with the manual that came with your 600D. I know how tempting it is to just jump right in and get playing, but in the long-run I think you'll save yourself a lot of headaches by reading the manual and learning what all the buttons, dials and switches on your camera do.
    Have fun! :)
  • Cheers yes thats what I meant by the dial and No i was only turning the the larger ring not the outer one. I'll have to dig out the manual my rooms like planet junk at the moment.
    Ive never thought to touch the otherside of the lens and turn it. I understand now lol. I can see how it would be out of focus now. I have to say I felt amused at how obvious it was and easy to do once I realised what Id doen wrong. Cheers guys
  • It's great to hear that you've fixed your issue. Now I'm looking forward to seeing the films and special effects you produce! B-)
  • Guys you're advice good for camcorder user's too. Many people are lost when they take the settings off of auto and go into the manual controls. Sadly many of the manuals don't explain what the settings mean in an easily understandable fashion. :(

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