Star Trek DS9 and Other shows the Software that was used.

Hi,
I was wondering this question.. I was watching Star Trek DS9 (Deep Space 9) and most of the effects they did then, can be redone on HF or Visionlab. I was wondering what Software where they using on shows like DS9, TNG, Doc Who (newer doc who), Terminator 3, and Star Trek First Contact and the Matrix first one. I was wondring about this. Thanks!

Comments

  • Interesting question. Regarding virtual landscapes there is e.g. VUE.
    VUE Website

  • Interesting question. Regarding virtual landscapes there is e.g. VUE.
    VUE Website

    I ment the special effects, like ships on fire and etc.. Back in the late 90's...
  • Do you have an example clip? It'd be fun to take a look at it and let the forum try and work backwords to how they did it.
    I know for Star Trek TNG all ships were physical models as opposed to CG. In that sense, scorch marks were probably just painted on and any explosions were a simple manner of clever compositing. Remember that TNG started in the 80s, so they weren't even using computers for editing the same way we think about today. They had video mixers and such, but non-linear editing wasn't mainstream by any stretch of the imagination at that time. Kind of fascinating, actually when you think how much they pulled off with stuff like this:
    [img]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a9/Vision_mixer.jpg/800px-Vision_mixer.jpg[/img]
  • In the late 90's, Maya was used a ton for CG work, and for a number of years, the 'best' 3D software bounced back and forth between Maya and Softimage XSI, depending on which had a newer version released. However, a lot of TV shows were using the slightly less expensive options, such as Lightwave, Cinema 4D and 3DStudio Max. For compositing, its likely they were using Shake.

  • Do you have an example clip? It'd be fun to take a look at it and let the forum try and work backwords to how they did it.
    I know for Star Trek TNG all ships were physical models as opposed to CG. In that sense, scorch marks were probably just painted on and any explosions were a simple manner of clever compositing. Remember that TNG started in the 80s, so they weren't even using computers for editing the same way we think about today. They had video mixers and such, but non-linear editing wasn't mainstream by any stretch of the imagination at that time. Kind of fascinating, actually when you think how much they pulled off with stuff like this:
    [img]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a9/Vision_mixer.jpg/800px-Vision_mixer.jpg[/img]

    Just go watch deep space nine and how did they do the phaser effect, the transporter, ships on fire and etc. Back then I wondered what software was being used back then, cause now HF will do the same effects and it was more of a curious question I wondered about.

  • In the late 90's, Maya was used a ton for CG work, and for a number of years, the 'best' 3D software bounced back and forth between Maya and Softimage XSI, depending on which had a newer version released. However, a lot of TV shows were using the slightly less expensive options, such as Lightwave, Cinema 4D and 3DStudio Max. For compositing, its likely they were using Shake.

    I wondered about that, cause as I watch some ds9 shows, there were effects that visionlab had and HF can pull all those effects off. Just curious to me since the time the shows come out and computers were not as advanced at that time.... :)
  • Babylon 5 was one of the first shows to use computers in 1993.
    "Babylon 5 also distinguished itself at a time when models and miniature were still standard by becoming one of the first television shows to use computer technology in creating visual effects. This was achieved using Amiga-based Video Toasters at first, and later Pentium and Alpha-based systems"
    "The show's success was seen as a great asset for Commodore Business Machines, the makers of the Amiga computer, and for NewTek, the company which made the Video Toaster card and its accompanying 3-D animation program, Lightwave 3D."

    Many of the Star Trek models and props were sold at action a few years ago.
    The end of an era.
    http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=418_1224439329&to_friend=1
    Tom

  • Babylon 5 was one of the first shows to use computers in 1993.
    "Babylon 5 also distinguished itself at a time when models and miniature were still standard by becoming one of the first television shows to use computer technology in creating visual effects. This was achieved using Amiga-based Video Toasters at first, and later Pentium and Alpha-based systems"
    "The show's success was seen as a great asset for Commodore Business Machines, the makers of the Amiga computer, and for NewTek, the company which made the Video Toaster card and its accompanying 3-D animation program, Lightwave 3D."

    Many of the Star Trek models and props were sold at action a few years ago.
    The end of an era.
    http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=418_1224439329&to_friend=1
    Tom

    I knew they sold the star trek models, cause they were using computer gen ships in the last few movies, but the whole thing is to make you wonder about the visual effects, there are a lot in Star TrekVoyager, ds9, and etc other than the ships that they got away with and now at your home you can do the same type of effects. Just intersteing how things were done back then!

  • Hi,
    I was wondering this question.. I was watching Star Trek DS9 (Deep Space 9) and most of the effects they did then, can be redone on HF or Visionlab. I was wondering what Software where they using on shows like DS9, TNG, Doc Who (newer doc who), Terminator 3, and Star Trek First Contact and the Matrix first one. I was wondring about this. Thanks!

    Wondertouch's Particle Illusion was used in ST: Voyager and Enterprise. See below;
    http://www.wondertouch.com/index_2.asp
    If you go into the Examples menu and then TV and Film you'll see other media it was used for.

  • Wondertouch's Particle Illusion was used in ST: Voyager and Enterprise. See below;
    http://www.wondertouch.com/index_2.asp
    If you go into the Examples menu and then TV and Film you'll see other media it was used for.

    Is wondertouch's particle illusion a actual program or a plug in?

  • Is wondertouch's particle illusion a actual program or a plug in?

    It is both. You can buy a stand alone version or as a After Effects plugin. I had a sixth month license for the stand alone version which came with my upgrade of Vegas Pro 10. It's a good program but I don't think they have done a new version for quite some time.
    Tigrestripe
  • Particle Illusion is a 2D particle generator. As you're using HitFilm you can probably do pretty much anything you'd want to do particle-wise already.
    As has already been covered, all TV work was practical models until 1993 when Babylon 5 pioneered full-CG for its effects. Foundation Imaging was the company that did all the CG work on that show. A few years later Deep Space 9 and Voyager switched over to CG as well, with Foundation Imaging also doing that work. I believe they also did the Starship Troopers spin-off show.
    In the 90s Lightwave was certainly the 3D software of choice. Phantom Menace then made Maya the #1 for a few years, though now the field is much wider and different VFX houses will use different software - and often their own proprietary stuff.
    With some of our previous software I felt we'd got to a kind of early/mid-90s level of visual effects. With HitFilm we've brought everything up-to-date, thanks to full 3D particle systems and proper 3D camera tracking support. Once 2D point tracking goes in later this year HitFilm will genuinely be capable of pretty much anything you need.
    That these kind of effects can be done on a home computer for $399 is pretty amazing. Perhaps I'm biased because I work here, but I still remember it was only about 12 years ago that I was editing with a dual-VCR setup. It's incredible how far video technology has come in a decade.

  • Particle Illusion is a 2D particle generator. As you're using HitFilm you can probably do pretty much anything you'd want to do particle-wise already.
    As has already been covered, all TV work was practical models until 1993 when Babylon 5 pioneered full-CG for its effects. Foundation Imaging was the company that did all the CG work on that show. A few years later Deep Space 9 and Voyager switched over to CG as well, with Foundation Imaging also doing that work. I believe they also did the Starship Troopers spin-off show.
    In the 90s Lightwave was certainly the 3D software of choice. Phantom Menace then made Maya the #1 for a few years, though now the field is much wider and different VFX houses will use different software - and often their own proprietary stuff.
    With some of our previous software I felt we'd got to a kind of early/mid-90s level of visual effects. With HitFilm we've brought everything up-to-date, thanks to full 3D particle systems and proper 3D camera tracking support. Once 2D point tracking goes in later this year HitFilm will genuinely be capable of pretty much anything you need.
    That these kind of effects can be done on a home computer for $399 is pretty amazing. Perhaps I'm biased because I work here, but I still remember it was only about 12 years ago that I was editing with a dual-VCR setup. It's incredible how far video technology has come in a decade.

    Quite glad you guys announced Hitfilm when you did. I almost bought Particle Illusion. Now, if you have influence with Pixelfarm and could get them to add export to Carrara then I'd be in heaven or pretty close to it.

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