Rate the last film you watched

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  • edited January 2012
    The Untouchables-10/10
    That is one good movie.
    I liked the casting, and the dialogue was good. (I didn't like Oscar.)
  • Mission Impossible 4: 7.5
    Good movie, but wish it had more soul to it.
  • What made Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol good was watching it in Imax. A lot of scenes, especially the Dubai building part was a visual feast as a result of seeing incredible quality image on a huge screen. Since it came on straight after the prologue for TDKR, I was excited anyway :)
  • edited February 2012
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  • Slumdog Millionaire: 8/10
    Finally got around to watching this! Great movie! Wish more Oscar-ish type movies were like that; too many movies forget the entertainment part of filmmaking.
  • The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011): 9/10
    The first of the Millennium trilogy of books to be remade into film by Hollywood (I haven't seen the original 2009 films), this was brilliant. I haven't read the books, but am about to start the first one. This was good, as it meant I had absolutely no idea what to expect from the film.
    The title sequence sets the tone for the film well, particularly with the Led Zepp cover over the top. The film itself is both brutal and utterly captivating; while it is quite long, you don't really notice the time going by. Multiple storylines, and an excellent soundtrack. The performance by lead actress Rooney Mara is brilliant: unrestrained, quietly insane and teeming with anger.

  • The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011): 9/10
    The first of the Millennium trilogy of books to be remade into film by Hollywood (I haven't seen the original 2009 films), this was brilliant. I haven't read the books, but am about to start the first one. This was good, as it meant I had absolutely no idea what to expect from the film.
    The title sequence sets the tone for the film well, particularly with the Led Zepp cover over the top. The film itself is both brutal and utterly captivating; while it is quite long, you don't really notice the time going by. Multiple storylines, and an excellent soundtrack. The performance by lead actress Rooney Mara is brilliant: unrestrained, quietly insane and teeming with anger.

    Not sure I'm going to watch it. I watched the original (swedish) ones and they were great....unsure as to why they felt it was necessary to do a Hollywood remake.

  • Not sure I'm going to watch it. I watched the original (swedish) ones and they were great....unsure as to why they felt it was necessary to do a Hollywood remake.

    Indeed - according to Wikipedia, the director of the original said the same thing. I'd say that while it is odd (and for those that worked on/enjoyed the originals, probably also annoying) to have a remake done so soon, there's no less reason to remake it than any other film. Even if the originals were masterpieces, the story is still worthy of other adaptations. I will watch them at some point though.
  • The Innkeepers - 8/10
    I was a big fan of Ti West's 2009 film, The House of the Devil (which is a 10/10 for me), so I had big expectations for this one, which is available on demand right now, and in theaters February 3rd. It didn't disappoint.
    Taking place in a century-old hotel on the verge of going out of business, and focusing on two hotel employees who are watching over the place while the owner is away, it chronicles a weekend of spooky occurrences, which are wont to occur when an old hotel is practically empty. The leads investigate the story of a woman whose ghost is said to have haunted the building after she hung herself on her wedding day.
    In a lot of ways, it's very similar to THotD; both have charming and likable leads, both shrug off modern trends in horror in favor of a more cerebral, slow-burn approach, and both have a small cast with few sets. Things happen naturally and gradually, and the filmmakers don't rely on scaring the audience, so much as ensnaring them...
    Early on, there's a scene where a character is shown one of those infamous "Nothing happens for a long time and then BOOM! Out of nowhere, a zombie appears, screaming at you" videos that were oh so popular with pranksters back in the day. As it happens, that's a very apt analogy for how the film plays out. If you're a fan of modern horror films in the vein of Saw and Paranormal Activity, you will be bored to tears by The Innkeepers. There's a lot of talking, and hardly any action to speak of. The suspense comes from the atmosphere, and the need for some sort of payoff. Fortunately, that payoff does eventually come, and it is very satisfying. This is the "Death Proof" of haunted hotel movies.
    There are still a lot of classic horror film standbys here. There are "Don't go in there!" moments, and "Phew, it was just a harmless animal." Thankfully, though, these situations aren't resolved with pointless shocks, but with actual plot movement, and realism. While it is a film about the supernatural (or at least, the search for the supernatural,) almost everything is grounded in reality. There are still unexplainable supernatural elements, but as an audience, we must accept these as a part of the film's universe, and draw our own conclusions.
    Right now I'd say this is a very underrated film. It's superbly done technically, and there's an attention to detail here that a lot of filmmakers could learn a thing or two from. The characters are charming, there's a subtle tongue-in-cheek humour throughout, and the resolution is built up very well, and actually makes sense. File this one under, "Recommended."
  • Cowboys and aliens
    It's a good film with good cinematography and awesome effects!
    But it is very predictable like ,ost films that feature aliens invading earth before the current day, the humans will always win and the main character servives.
    How everit has a good story line and is very different to many current films coming out at the moment so I give it 7/10
  • Last film I watched, only partly as daughter fell very ill part way through was Hugo Cabret. Illness not caused by the movie. :P Movie was in 3D and for me it detracted from a visually stunning piece of cinema. It didn't feel like you were part of the film, although that was the attempt. It felt like oh, here's another 3d effect. Very sad when the director is Martin Scoresese
  • Movie was in 3D and for me it detracted from a visually stunning piece of cinema. It didn't feel like you were part of the film, although that was the attempt. It felt like oh, here's another 3d effect. Very sad when the director is Martin Scoresese

    That's really surprising to me, because I thought that film used 3D better than any other film before it.
  • Last DVD I watched is called Hank And Mike about 2 Easter bunnies who get laid off. Canadian indie film and this aint no kids flick. Watching 2 guys in bunny suits interact in the normal world with no weird reactions is pretty funny. "They're pink, annoyed and unemployed!" I'd give it a 7 out of 10. The humour isn't everyone's thing and the picture quality when viewed in HD on a big monitor isn't the best. Still it was an enjoyable movie. Not bad for a $2.00 DVD in the bargain bin.
  • War Horse
    8/10
    Very well done movie. The acting was great. John Williams was the perfect composer for this one. I read that they had only 3 vfx shots in the film; I think one of them was when Joey (the horse) tried to jump over a trench but slammed into the wall. One thing I didn't like was the color grading on a couple shots at the end, they seemed way too orange. I did like the way they ended it with silhouettes.
  • edited January 2012
    Cave of Forgotten Dreams: 8/10
    This is a truly fascinating documentary by Werner Herzog about the Chauvet caves in France. The cave is special because it contains the earliest known illustrations by humans, of various animals that lived in the region over 30,000 years ago. Some of it gets a little overly dramatic, and Herzog's narration and interview style is often quite abstract, but the imagery is spectacular, and the subject is extremely interesting. I can only imagine how cool it must have been to see it in 3D.
  • Tucker & Dale Versus Evil - 9/10. Perfectly paced. Uses the idea to its fullest extent, then ends. Very funny.
    Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol - 7/10. Fantastic up until the India finale, where it becomes utterly stupid. Listen to my podcast review here: http://www.itsatrap.co.uk/?p=340 :)
  • After spending a lot of money on a new camera and Hitfilm Cinema trips are out for a while for me so I mainly watch slightly older movies which come free with BT vision

    Tucker and Dale vs Evil was one of the last movies I watched really enjoyable funny clever movie,9/10

    Infestation: this was a movie I knew nothing about before I started watching it. Apparently it was made for the scifi channel with a budget of 5 million. I started with low expectation but really enjoyed. Good story, some great monster effects and a few glaring continuity errors 8/10
  • Sherlock Holmes II: A Game of Shadows: 6/10
    I was really looking forward to this film, but it didn't live up to my expectations. The pace was a little slow, the storyline good but not fantastic, and overall it just felt like it was waiting to get started.
    Spoilery-bit:
    Noomi Rapace's character barely does anything throughout, and Rachel McAdams' Irene Adler exits early on, which is a tremendous waste of a good actor and an even better character. Stephen Fry's Mycroft isn't fantastic either, mostly providing comic relief.

    Good points: the banter between Holmes and Watson was enjoyable, the production design was fantastic, and there is a fantastic line about a horse.
    Margin Call: 8/10
    Shot on a Red One and edited in FCP, the film had a budget of just $3.5m, but attracted some big names - shows what you can do with a good script. The subject matter of this film means it involves a whole lot of financial jargon and numbers, but luckily various characters ask "for it in English" at points throughout the film, so us simpletons can keep up. Good performances from the cast, an enjoyable (though bleak) film.
  • On the subject of Sherlock Holmes II, there's an exhibition at London's University of the Arts this spring focused on Sarah Greenwood's (Production Designer) work on the film and its predecessor, which promises to give a great insight into how Production Design works on big films.
    More here.
  • edited January 2012
    Whoa, we have spoiler tags now?
    Spoiler tags rule.
  • I have a stupid question. How do you get the spoilers to show?
  • Click the thing that says "Show".
  • Ah... yeah, I tried that with my Macbook but nothing happened. I just tried with my PC and it works.
  • edited January 2012
    I want to write something here, but I have such trouble and frustration dealing with some of the opinions and assertions about some of these films. Not to say anyone is wrong, and of course each viewer is entitled to their own opinion. But....whew. Some of the thoughts in this thread...

    As for me, I saw 97 theatrical releases last year/of 2011- most of the major ones- so I've got an opinion on most films mentioned here. Loved Hugo. Only movie I'd say not only works fantastically in 3D, but definitely works to the style and storytelling of the film. One of the best of the year. Crazy to see such a lukewarm reaction to it. First film since, I dunno, probably Big Fish, before my little sister was even born, where Ben and I were able to go with our whole family (teenage sibling, 9-year-old sister, parents) and everyone be pretty wholly satisfied. Just a mesmerizingly magical film.
    Liked War Horse a lot. Loved many parts of Sherlock Holmes 2, and don't think it deserves much of the negativity it got- highly-stylish with directorial flourishes that enthuse the storytelling/direction of the film- but it was more or less forgettable. Thought Margin Call was a dragging but cerebral and effective movie. Liked Dragon Tattoo, though found it a little too thriller-y/stuck into it's genre. Still mastefully-told and adeptly-acted, though.
    The loathing it gets by being a 'remake', however, absolutely perplexes me. While the Swedish adaptations were interesting and engrossing, and Noomi Rapace played a great rendition of Lisbeth Salander- the creations weren't the ultimate gift to cinema- and much of the first 'film' felt like what it was: a scaled-down, gritted-up TV-movie.
    I felt the Dragon Tattoo Fincher film did the story and books justice appropriately, with a fulfilling budget, good cast, and artfully talented people at the helm of the technical and production-design side of things, cinematically, which all gave credence and legitimacy to it being made. The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo was vintage David Fincher- unflinching, engrossing, enveloping inside it's own dark side- and I think it's silly to try and call it a 'worse remake' of a low-budget Swedish TV movie. That was fine- but the film, one I didn't even think was 'OMG crazy good', was such a cut above it on almost all fronts.
    Sorry about that- had to get it out.
    As I've said many times nearing the end of the year, and on into this one, I felt that 2011 was an absolute knockout year for Hollywood, for all genres and budgets, and for movies in-general- and I made it a special effort to see as much and as many of those films as I could. I even compiled a list, alongside Ben and our Atomic team, and came up with some 'Best Of' columns in our opinion, which I posted to the Atomic Productions Fan Page and am listing below:
    [indent]‎2011 was a great year for movies of every genre and budget. Check out our year-end list of awards for picture, actors, and director!
    Top 25 of 2011:
    1. The Tree of Life
    2. Drive
    3. Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows Part II
    4. Hugo
    5. Midnight in Paris
    6. Moneyball
    7. X-Men: First Class
    8. 50/50
    9. Beginners
    10. The Descendants
    11. Rise of the Planet of the Apes
    12. The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo
    13. Limitless
    14. Source Code
    15. Rango
    16. The Ides of March
    17. War Horse
    18. Hanna
    19. The Help
    20. The Green Hornet
    21. Fast Five
    22. The Devil’s Double
    23. Warrior
    24. Bridesmaids
    25. Attack The Block
    Best Director:
    Terrence Malick - The Tree of Life
    *Martin Scorsese - Hugo
    **Nicolas Winding Refn - Drive
    Best Actor:
    Brad Pitt - Moneyball, The Tree of Life
    *George Clooney - The Descendants
    **Ryan Gosling - Drive, The Ides of March, Crazy Stupid Love
    Best Actress:
    Viola Davis - The Help
    *Charlize Theron - Young Adult
    **Tilda Swinton - We Need To Talk About Kevin
    Best Supporting Actor:
    Christopher Plummer - Beginners, The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo
    *Albert Brooks - Drive
    **Michael Fassbender - X-Men: First Class, Shame
    Best Supporting Actress:
    Jessica Chastain - The Tree of Life, The Help
    *Octavia Spencer - The Help
    **Carey Mulligan - Drive
    (* Denotes Runner-Up)
    We loved the past year of movies, from January slumps to March surprises to summer blockbusters with emotional weight, to the heady, gripping dramas of the fall. It was the best year since 2007 for cinema.[/indent]
  • DanielGWoodDanielGWood Staff
    edited January 2012

    Whoa, we have spoiler tags now?

    Indeed we do! I have to keep reminding myself to use them rather than the old white-text method. Spoiler about the spoiler tags: Unfortunately they don't work in emails - the full text is shown.


    Ah... yeah, I tried that with my Macbook but nothing happened. I just tried with my PC and it works.

    Hmm it ought to work on Mac. Can you tell me what browser you were using, and the version?
  • Really, Andrew? All those superhero movies and no Thor?

  • Hmm it ought to work on Mac. Can you tell me what browser you were using, and the version?

    Working fine for me, using the latest version of Safari, on mac.
    Transformers 3 - 7.5/10 - I don't like using .5 marks but it's inbetween 7 and 8. I really enjoyed the film, but i din't enjoy it as much as when i watched in the cinema - maybe there was something lacking in my home set up (surround sound maybe - I must save some money to take a plunge on this), I'm a huge fan of Michael Bay's style so everything looked fantastic to me, and the Chicago battle scene was relentlessly awesome, and the attention to detail in the set design is staggering. It loses points as some scenes just drag and aren't important (a running issue with the transformers films) and the 'wacky' humour is outright inappropriate in many places, one moment destroys what would have been a suitable, effective ending,
    but instead we get bumblebee fumbling with cogs for wedding rings - eurgh.

    Book of Eli- 1/10 - just awful, laughable 'over dramatic' shots + loud noises and blink and you miss it action. Predictable, and clichéd, was not a fan of the camera shots and overly processed visual look either. I Made the mistake of seeing this in the cinema ages ago, it's the type of film you walk out of saying "lets never talk about this", I caught most of it round a friends last night, nobody was impressed, the whole film lacks any impact, and I struggle to watch anything with Milia Kunis without something in my head saying "shut up Meg" - I'm not even going to go over any of the bible stuff.

  • Liked Dragon Tattoo, though found it a little too thriller-y/stuck into it's genre. Still mastefully-told and adeptly-acted, though.
    The loathing it gets by being a 'remake', however, absolutely perplexes me. While the Swedish adaptations were interesting and engrossing, and Noomi Rapace played a great rendition of Lisbeth Salander- the creations weren't the ultimate gift to cinema- and much of the first 'film' felt like what it was: a scaled-down, gritted-up TV-movie.
    I felt the Dragon Tattoo Fincher film did the story and books justice appropriately, with a fulfilling budget, good cast, and artfully talented people at the helm of the technical and production-design side of things, cinematically, which all gave credence and legitimacy to it being made. The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo was vintage David Fincher- unflinching, engrossing, enveloping inside it's own dark side- and I think it's silly to try and call it a 'worse remake' of a low-budget Swedish TV movie. That was fine- but the film, one I didn't even think was 'OMG crazy good', was such a cut above it on almost all fronts.

    OK - I give in; I'll give the remake (/different adaptation) a go. However, whilst originally made for TV, I personally think it translated really well to the big screen. Will need to see the 2011 version to be able to do a comparison though.
    On another note, glad to see I'm not the only person on Hitfilm who rated Hanna....
  • Shame: 8/10
    One of the thousand-or-so films that Michael Fassbender is in at the moment (when does he sleep?), both his performance and that of co-star Carey Mulligan are flawless. I haven't seen Steve McQueen's feature debut yet, but I enjoyed his work as the director here - some very long shots, including a midnight run through New York that must have taken some doing. The score is also great, really seems to suit the mood. Well worth watching all in all.
  • edited January 2012
    Underworld Awakening: 7/10
    Can't go wrong with vampires (unless its twilight, ughhh), werewolves, bloodshed, and gunfigts. Pretty much just like the other movies.
    Haywire: 5/10
    Lots of pointless shots that seem like they were done just to eat up time. For instance, a 10 minute on-foot chase scene (not as exciting as a car chase). Gina Cerano can definitely fight, but she needs to attend some acting classes.
    Everybody else in the movie did a solid job.

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