Rate the last film you watched

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  • The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra - 8/10 - I enjoyed this quite a bit, although it did go a little too far in the "making fun of 50s sci-fi dialogue" department for me after awhile. It was a great premise, did an excellent job of mimicking old b&w sci-fi stories, costuming, and dialogue, but sometimes it seemed like they were trying just a little too hard. It wasn't quite as fun to watch as "Fido" but was definitely enjoyable.
    I am Number 4 - 7/10 - I'm not much into "teen" action/sci-fi movies, but this was a decent movie. It felt like a cross between Twilight (which I despise) and a good long episode of Smallville. It was a little too sophomorish with the obvious "red energy = bad, good energy = good" type of visuals, but I liked it overall.
    Thor - 8/10 - Another movie that I enjoyed quite a bit. There was just a little bit of camp, but not enough to make it as corny as the Green Hornet. The effects were great, and the story was good, and although it was obviously a set-up for a sequel, it was nice that it didn't just end with the "get the girl and ride off into the sunset" scenario.
  • I also watched Thor the other day and was impressed with it, although it didn't have as much action as i would have liked. The scenes in Asgard were very beautiful especially the rainbow bridge, Anthony Hopkins- as usual- was brilliant. Like i mentioned though i was expecting plenty of arse kicking- especially from Idris Elba ( who only kicked two arses if i remember- the minimum requirement is at least 3 arses kicked for good action i reckon) Was a pretty good film though :D
  • edited November 2011
    Pontypool: 8/10
    This movie really took me by surprise. I watched it without knowing anything about it apart from the Netflix synopsis, and I'd suggest you do the same. This is definitely one that going in with very little prior knowledge of the plot is a good thing, as knowing too much would spoil the suspense somewhat. It was a lot of fun trying to piece things together as it went along. But the basic story is that a down-on-his-luck radio personality in Ontario encounters some strange callers during his morning show. It is a slow-burn style indie horror film that has some pretty great payoff once things get rolling. It's well acted, tells a simple story very well, and is suuuuuper creepy at times. I definitely recommend it.
  • Captain America: 7.5/10
    I enjoyed the film but as a superhero movie it felt like it lacking some 'pazzah!', which is to be expected really considering the character. I think I've just been spoilt by all of these other modern comic book films. Saying that though there was some good set pieces but it definitely felt like it was there to lead to us elsewhere, ie, The Avengers. I did really enjoy it, although I don't have the urge to watch it again straight away that I have with most comic book films. Plus Chris Evans always nails it.
    The Human Centipede 2: 0/10
    Honestly no matter how hard the art huggers attempt to find an excuse to give this film a reason to exist it is complete and utter bull. This film is considered to be fairly shocking, as to be expected considering the story, but it's just so unnecessary. I'm not easily shocked, if ever I am at all, but I'm stone cold shocked that this film was budgeted, found actors and got made at all. Fair play to anyone that found this film enjoyable for whatever reason - each to their own - but I just think that this film did things just to make a name for the director. Such as, for anyone that's seen it, the baby - was that at all necessary? Did it enhance that moment in any way? There will always be that 'they say its so shocking I MUST see it!' vibe with films like this but I really wouldn't recommend wasting your time on this.

  • Pontypool: 8/10
    This movie really took me by surprise. I watched it without knowing anything about it apart from the Netflix synopsis, and I'd suggest you do the same. This is definitely one that going in with very little prior knowledge of the plot is a good thing, as knowing too much would spoil the suspense somewhat. It was a lot of fun trying to piece things together as it went along. But the basic story is that a down-on-his-luck radio personality in Ontario encounters some strange callers during his morning show. It is a slow-burn style indie horror film that has some pretty great payoff once things get rolling. It's well acted, tells a simple story very well, and is suuuuuper creepy at times. I definitely recommend it.

    Ah, yes, saw that last year. I really enjoyed that movie. Especially (not wanting to spoil anything) the mechanism by which "it" happened. Quite novel I thought.

  • The Human Centipede 2: 0/10
    Honestly no matter how hard the art huggers attempt to find an excuse to give this film a reason to exist it is complete and utter bull. This film is considered to be fairly shocking, as to be expected considering the story, but it's just so unnecessary. I'm not easily shocked, if ever I am at all, but I'm stone cold shocked that this film was budgeted, found actors and got made at all. Fair play to anyone that found this film enjoyable for whatever reason - each to their own - but I just think that this film did things just to make a name for the director. Such as, for anyone that's seen it, the baby - was that at all necessary? Did it enhance that moment in any way? There will always be that 'they say its so shocking I MUST see it!' vibe with films like this but I really wouldn't recommend wasting your time on this.

    I totally agree. I tried watching the first one last weekend on Netflix and thought it was horrible garbage. I'm fine with some gore as long as the rest of the film has something of substance, but HC just doesn't. It's all gore and shock, and it just seems utterly pointless. One of my friends sent me a super excited text the other night saying she was going to see Human Centipede 2, and the only thing I could think was, "why?" Why anyone would pay money to see something like that is completely beyond me.
  • Source Code - finally saw this and really liked it. Great to see proper science fiction being represented in cinemas, even if it is only by one director. It felt a little like a (particularly good) Twilight Zone or Outer Limits episode, but that's no bad thing. Lots of people seem to dislike the ending, but I actually thought it made the film.
    Sunshine - seen this many times, but watched it again yesterday. Although I'm well aware of all its many flaws (unnecessary genre switch once Pinbacker arrives; the Icarus crews being clearly unsuitable for the missions and having presumably cheated their way through psych tests; some silly tech) I still absolutely love the film. One of the most visionary visual experiences I've ever had, and some of the best VFX of the last 10 years.
  • edited November 2011
    Hell's Highway: (1932) Supposed to raise public awareness to the plight prisoners on work chain gangs. Acting and dialogue are way dated. So much so that I found myself getting tickled at the speach, slang, and sometimes goofy facial expressions of the actors. It doesn't translate well to today, however being dated made it fun, at times funny.
    Gangster's Boy: (1938) A young Jackie Cooper. Another movie trying to give a social lesson. Let not the sins of the father be visited upon the son. Gangster Dad returns to live with son and wife after being away for years. Son is a stand out athlete and high school student who is then discriminated against when the identity of his father is revealed. After awhile the "social lesson" gets to be a bit much. But again, the stylization of speach and acting makes the whole thing funny.

    Duff
  • edited November 2011
    Sunshine (8.5/10): Saw Sunshine again the other day. Its one of those movies that has some wonderful visuals. As Simon said it does have a strange twist in genres, but it is still one of my favourites. I actually watched it for the first time in the old FXhome offices all those years ago :)
    Justin
  • edited November 2011
    Microcosmos (1996): 10/10
    Aside from the Planet Earth series, this must be the most beautifully photographed nature documentary in existence. I'm a sucker for nature docs, and I'm not sure how this one flew under my radar for so long. It's positively enthralling all the way through. With minimal narration (basically just bookends by the lovely Kristin Scott Thomas, at least in the English-language version), the film lets the subjects speak for themselves, along with some help from a highly compelling score.
    This is all about insects, so if you're not into creepy-crawlies, this probably isn't going to be your cup of tea. Extreme close-ups abound, I have a hard time imagining how it was even shot much of the time. The cinematography is outstanding, and sometimes truly seems impossible. It must have taken incredible amounts of patience and some very keen observing for this to come about. There is some great use of slow-motion and time-lapse, too. It's amazing that seeing these creatures so up close can really give them this weight and importance that one might never have considered otherwise. There's a sequence on the gestation of wasps that is just fascinating. There really is a whole different world just below our perception, and this does a great job of revealing its structure and the intricacies of the interactions of these insects.
    Overall this is an absurdly gorgeous film that focuses on some amazing and sometimes alien beings. I definitely recommend it.
    Multiplicity (1996) 8/10
    This is a seriously underrated comedy from Harold Ramis. It makes great use of the cloning technique that I'm sure we're all very familiar with here, with some rather clever sequences. Snappy dialogue and sticky situations abound, but the highlight of the film is Michael Keaton, who is an absolute genius. It's worth watching just for his performances. Dude is a legend. Not much else to say really.
  • Black Lightning 6/10
    A super-hero movie about a guy who gets a flying car and becomes a crime fighter. Caught it on Netflix earlier this week. It's in Russian so I had to read subtitles (which didn't bother me that much). It's enjoyable, but it's a carbon copy of Spider-Man 1 in some parts. If you like super-heroes and wonder what people outside of Hollywood are doing with the genre I would check it out, but really it's nothing original.
    I Spy 7.5/10
    This week was all about taking chances on Netflix, and I'm really glad I watched this one. One of the funniest Eddie Murphy performances in recent years. Some parts had me rolling till I couldn't breath. It also reminded me how much I like Owen Wilson.
  • Last movie I watched was Earth vs the Flying Saucers (1956) 8/10
    I love classic sci-fi films so for me this is a great film. The special effects in this film run from great to really bad. Fortunately for the era of the film most are great, but there are a few scenes that kinda hurt the film. The alien costumes are really bad, but the space ships are animated by Ray Harryhausen and at times are amazingly convincing. Watching this film I was struck by how many shots from this film have inspired shots in later movies like Independence Day and Battle Los Angeles. I really enjoyed watching this classic film. If you are a sci-fi fan, I recommend taking a look at this film if only to see where we came from.
  • edited December 2011
    Rise of the Planet of the Apes: 10/10
    This movie straight up blew me away. I didn't expect it to be anywhere near as good as it was based on the trailers. Just finished watching it, and right now I can't think of a single thing I didn't like about it. I guess there were a few bits that were kinda cheesy and unrealistic (aside from the magic ape-ascension gene therapy gas, which gets a pass, because how else is it going to happen?) but the only thing I could say I'd do differently is make it longer. A sequel seems like an absolute must to me. This was just downright awesome and inspiring.
    The CGI is incredible. Maurice the Orangutan was especially impressive, as I never questioned for a moment whether or not he was a real ape. The illusion works. If I hadn't known ahead of time that they didn't use any real apes in the film, I would have assumed many of them were real. If it doesn't win awards for the CGI, I'll be very surprised. The motion capture, as well, was just fantastic, and the facial expressions really sell it. Buck's expression during the "NO" scene was damn perfect, gave me goosebumps (though I'm sure the rest of what was going on in that scene didn't hurt.) The acting also deserves a mention. An overall very well-rounded cast that I didn't have any major issues with, which is rare, especially in a blockbuster-type film. There are some phoned-in and cheesy bits here and there, but like I said, nothing that really bothered me. Andy Serkis' performance was brilliant as usual, and I'd say far, far better, and more thoughtful than his Kong. I was even impressed by James Franco, which I didn't expect.
    It's tight, emotional, intense, and awe-inspiring. After some looking around, apparently a sequel is in the works, which is very good news. I imagine it'll revolve around the mission to Mars returning... :) Anyway, I can't think of a film this year that I liked more. It's just a really good movie.
  • edited December 2011
    I just saw Hugo today, and thought it was fantastic in all respects. The pacing starts off kind of strangely, but captivates quickly. A great film for anyone, but especially filmmakers. Started to seem like it was out of Scorsese's comfort zone, but it's not. If you like 3D at all, go for the 3D version–immersive and well done. I thought it was brilliant. A dream of a film with a great screenplay. One of my favorites this year, and definitely in my list of films that I love.
    A lot of the following are available on NetflixOD:
    I recommend Wrist Cutters: A Love Story. Sounds more depressing than it is, but is actually a fantastic and heartwarming indy dark comedy in a neat, and desolate setting. I also quite liked Never Let You Go, if you're into dystopian subject matter–though that one's a bit more on the depressing side. If you like Miyazaki films, I've recently seen and enjoyed Nausiccaa of the Valley of the Winds. If you haven't and are interested in getting into Miyazaki films, I might start with something else (maybe Mononoke, Spirited Away, or Howl's Moving Castle). Can't say any of these are for everyone, but worth looking into.
    I've also been on a documentary spree the past couple of weeks, and would highly recommend the following: Man on Wire ("professional" tightrope walker who crossed the twin towers, beautiful), The Pixar Story, Kicking It (homeless world cup), Bela Fleck: Throw Down Your Heart (beautiful film, Bela Fleck experiments with banjo around Africa), Pelada (more-so if you're into soccer/football, a well-done amateur film about pickup games, and the sport played 'round the world), and even The People vs George Lucas (more for Star Wars geeks though, or people who know *nothing* about Star Wars. Not for the apathetic).
    Midnight in Paris is romantic, brilliant fun, but don't think it has hit the shelves yet. I've also rewatched The Dead Poet's Society recently, and quite enjoyed it. All of the above get an 8/10 from me, that's just how I roll. [color="#FFFFFF"](actually, it isn't, I just don't like numbers)[/color]
    Crap films I've seen recently, that I think are worth avoiding, include: Our Idiot Brother (it was aight I guess, had good moments, but typical hollywood comedy), Bridesmaids (I thought this would be an appealing "chick flick," but it really really wasn't), and then '13 Assassins' was pretty mediocre, if you're one who delves into Asian martial arts cinema.

    Great thread, have added to my list and seen a handful already.

  • StormyKnight - yes, I wasn't genuinely recommending it. It's an awful film. :P I podcasted about it a while back: http://www.itsatrap.co.uk/?p=261

    Glad you have better taste than that! lol Although, I did watch the whole movie I suppose because it's like watching an accident on the highway, you can't help but look. All of the scifi channels movies are like that. Don't start watching 'cause you'll get stuck watching whether you want to or not. :huh:

  • Glad you have better taste than that! lol Although, I did watch the whole movie I suppose because it's like watching an accident on the highway, you can't help but look. All of the scifi channels movies are like that. Don't start watching 'cause you'll get stuck watching whether you want to or not. :huh:


    So true- i started watching one of the mega sharks vs equally big crocodile movies on there and realised i'd watched about half an hour of it!They have a very hypnotic quality to them.
  • Westworld (1973) 7/10
    If you are used to today's sci-fi action adventure films then this probably isn't for you. It has a much slower pace than films do now. This is an example of just how much one actor's performance can do for a film. Yule Brynner's performance as the Gunslinger is amazing. He has very little dialogue in the film, but just the way he moves adds to the feeling of creepiness and danger. If it wasn't for him, this film would probably be completely forgotten. The film is really ahead of its time. Its kinda funny that in 1973 the concept of a "computer virus" was laughable. How can a machine get a virus? Another landmark of this film, it is the first feature film with computer generated effects. Ok so its just the pixelated Gunslinger POV shots, but at the time it was quite an expensive effect. Its amazing how far we have come. I think the script could have used some work, its a bit dry and slow getting started. A lot of scenes in the beginning feel like they were just thrown in as time filler, they don't really serve the story much. That time could have been used better for building character. But for all its flaws I still enjoyed this movie. I would have rated it 6/10 but it got an extra point just for Yule Brynner's performance, that alone makes this film worth a watch.
  • edited December 2011
    Drive: 9/10 (Spoilers, probably)
    I finally got around to seeing this last night and really enjoyed it for the most part. Maybe it's a surprise that I liked Planet of the Apes more than this, because this a really beautiful and engaging film, I just thought it fell flat in the end. It's such a simple plot, and while that works to its benefit, it's also a bit disappointing because everything else is so fantastic and verging on over-the-top. I just didn't feel a sense of satisfaction in the end somehow. It's a slow burn with an amazing and explosive climax, and then it fizzles out. Not really sure what could have made the ending better for me, and maybe I just need to watch it again to fully appreciate it.
    Ryan Gosling's soft spoken sociopath stuntman really surprised me. His dialogue is minimal, but it's always wonderfully delivered and eloquent. In fact, most of the acting is this way. Ron Perlman gives a genius performance as the mob boss, and I think the only character I had a problem with was Albert Brooks'. I just can't take him seriously in a role like that, because I'm so much more familiar with his comedic work. He just doesn't strike me as a bad person, so anytime he plays a role like that, I find it a bit hard to believe. Bryan Cranston also, not surprisingly, gives a fantastic performance. Some actors seem like the same person no matter what role they're in, but Cranston is always different, and always great.
    This is an unexpectedly violent film as well. I knew Gosling's character was going to snap eventually, but I didn't expect him to stomp a dude's head into a pulp in an elevator, for example. His dark side takes a while to come out, and when it does, the film's dynamic completely shifts in a very interesting way.
    I really enjoyed Drive, and I'd recommend it to fans of Michael Mann's work, and people who like a tense, slow-moving drama.
  • Another Earth: 8/10 (trying not to spoil any more than the title does..)
    I'll start by saying I haven't seen Melancholia, so there's little point me making comparisons to it. I really enjoyed this film, one of the best this year for me. The sci-fi element is treated as a side-story to the main crux of the film, with lots of nice visual references to it throughout, and tantalising chunks of dialogue/discussion - just enough to get you thinking about it. The main story is very emotional, with a very impressive performance from Brit Marling in the lead role. It may be called predictable, but it's still ridiculously moving.
    Miss Bala: 7/10
    A very gritty, and from what I understand, realistic, portrayal of the problems in that part of Mexico. Fairly brutal in places, with some plot twists (which more cynical individuals might consider predictable). The descent of the main character is effectively done, you emphasize with her lack of choice due to the impossible situation she's in. Stays true to itself by avoiding a silly happy ending.
  • edited December 2011
    alienux- I felt the same way about "I Am Number Four". It's definately aimed at 14 year old girls (which I didn't know going into it) but there was something captivating about it. I'd give it a 7 out of 10.
    Just sat down to watch a western last night and a sci-fi movie broke out. "Cowboys and Aliens", I thought, was a fantastic movie. I don't know why we always think of alien movies being set in time from the 1940s forward- maybe because of the whole Roswell story?
    Anyway, I liked everything about this movie and it "wowed" me within the first half hour. It had a really good 'creep factor' involving the aliens too. It had a good score as well. I'd give it a 9 out of 10.
  • Hugo: 10/10
    This is Scorcese's finest work in years, if you ask me, and the best film I've seen in 2011. After watching the trailer (I really need to stop doing this,) I was convinced it was going to be a lame kids movie that couldn't hold my interest, but the film itself is revelatory. It's a cinema lover's dream come true.
    I haven't read the book, so I can't say how faithfully it's recreated on film, but it doesn't really matter, because the story shines in all aspects. Aside from a few noticeable continuity errors, which could have been purely intentional given the nature of the subject, and the overwhelming attention to detail elsewhere, I have no problems at all with the film. Taking place mostly in a train station in Paris, it is astonishingly detailed. Silent background tableaus interplay with intricately arranged foregrounds for a substantial "WOW" factor in practically every shot. The design is breathtaking. Re-creations of Méliès' sets are beautiful and awe inspiring, and they even went so far as to restore and convert pieces of his films into 3D, which is just amazing to see. It must have taken ages.
    I'm not one for huge wordy reviews, and you can find enough of those for this film already. I'll just say that if you haven't already seen it, and you're a fan of film and film history, GO SEE IT. And see it in 3D if you can. It's the best use of the technology that I've seen, and really shows what an amazing tool that can be in the hands of a capable filmmaker.
  • Warrior: 9/10. This is probably in large part because I'm an MMA fan, but I still loved it. And Tom Hardy is amazing in it.
  • Die Hard: 8.5/10
    Yes I know I'm a million years late, but finally got around to watching Die Hard. I might be the only one who watched this series backwards. I started with Live Free or Die Hard, and made my way down! Now that I've seen them all my favorites are definitely 4 and 1, and 3 my least favorite. Great series!
    I saw Hugo also because it counted as extra credit for one of my film classes. Pretty cool movie, and I liked all the film history in it cause I understood the references (made me feel all smart and all). I'd give it a 7/10.
  • Bridesmaids: 6/10
    Not as awful as the trailers implied.
    Super: 10/10
    Been meaning to see this one for a while. It's a very dark, very twisted, very violent and hilariously funny deconstruction of the superhero genre, tackling the subject in a far more grounded and less fantastical way than the similarly-themed Kick Ass.
    Rainn Wilson is incredible in the lead (so refreshing to have a lead in a (sort of) action movie who isn't an Action Movie Star), Kevin Bacon does the best Kevin Baconing I've seen for years and Ellen Page is brilliantly mental.
    A stunning, crazy film that has lingered in my mind for days afterwards. Fascinating, brutal, tragic and very funny.
  • Super really sold me on Ellen Page as an actress. I didn't think much of her after Juno, but then I saw Hard Candy, Inception, and finally Super, and now I think she's pretty brilliant. She has good range and she's quite charming when she wants to be. Her character in Super is just delightfully demented. Love that movie.
  • Where the Wild Things Are: 1/10
    We purchased this movie some time ago, but never got around to watching it until last night. Afterwards, my wife and I were glad we had watched it without the kids. The scenes before Max gets on the boat to go to the island were very difficult to watch. And when he gets back, there aren't any repercussions for his actions. Instead, he gets chocolate cake.
    I did enjoy the cinematogrphy on the island, as well as the creature effects (except for the owls). But other than that, there wasn't much in this movie I cared for. Even the first special feature was 15 minutes of them trying to get a dog to bark while running.
    After the movie ended, I turned to my wife and commented that I could have just played Titan Quest for 90 minutes or done something real. I rarely feel a movie is a total waste of time, but this one was.
  • I thought that movie was fascinating. The set and costume designs are spectacular, but I agree it's not really a film for kids, despite the source material. It's definitely a very very weird movie, though.
  • Girl with the Dragon Tattoo - 3.5/5
    A great example of why editing down a book greatly is necessary for a film adaptation. Too many subplots and things that are probably interesting and great in the book... are just overkill and a bit boring in this. The main story is interesting enough on its own. It also creates terrible pacing problems... the first 30 minutes feels like a "previously on..." recap, with the majority then finally slowing down for all of it... and then the 20 plus minute epilogue could probably have been a movie of its own.
  • X-men First Class - 7/10 - This was surprisingly good, and tightly constructed considering the short time between filming/post and release. I never liked the other x-men films much but this was far more entertaining - although there is a fair bit of contradiction between the series other films, but things like that happen when you need to flesh out characters more.
  • M:I4 - Ghost Protocol - 8/10
    Fast-paced, utterly daft, and very entertaining. It's got a little more humour than the last one, but not in a silly comic way. Stunts are fantastic throughout, well worth a watch.

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