New audio design tool from Gigantic Software

As I type this, they don't make the official announcement for another day, but it helps to have a friend in the company.
Ok, audio people, what this software tool, HydraLite, does is analyze one or more sounds, then attempt to synthesize variants. So--let's assume you have that one gunshot sound that you just love--the rest are weak, muffled, just no what you want--but you don't want to use the same sound over and over and over--so let HydraLite attempt to make variants for you! Yes, one could always load audio into a dedicated audio editor (say, Sound Forge) a do pitch shifts-time remaps, EQ curves, etc, etc, etc for variations, but this new HydraLite tool is certainly an exciting option!
The company is aiming this tool at game designers, but film/video folk always need SFX, too!
It's pretty nifty, although the asking price of $199 USD may place it out of the price range of a lot of people for such a specialized tool.
http://www.giganticsoftware.com/

Comments

  • edited July 2014
    That sounds awesome! ;) seriously though that would be usefull.
    I have a question about foley art. Since this topic is here I thought ip wouldn't open a topic for a petty question. When you are adding in foley elements like foot walking or someone tapping a rock with a stick, how do you get rid of the natural sound it makes then add the better one over? How does this work when it happens during dialogue?
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator
    Current feature film and TV show procedure basically treats production audio as a scratch track. Over 95% of all audio in current TV shows and movies is dubbed in post. So, long story short, they aren't blending overdubbed elements with production audio--they're replacing everything.
    However, at the indy level, we can't do that--Caleb, part of what you want to do on your shoots 9and the pros do this as well) is get some "Wild" audio for each location. This is where you tell everyone around tho shut up for a minute and you record a minute or so of the ambient audio for your location. That way, when you're adding overdubbed elements in, you have the ambient audio (sometimes this is called "room tone.") that you recorded to fill in the background. Then you'd cut the production audio for what you're overdubbing.
    If you go back to TV shows and movies from about 1985 or earlier you can actually often hear where overdubbed elements are added to existing production audio. ADR (Automated Dialog Replacement--aka dubbing) on older productions often was only done for principal actors--so you'll hear a nice, clean studio take for the leads, then, suddenly, NOISE as they cut in the production audio for a day-player.
    These days they're more likely to overdub everyone--but a day-player may be overdubbed by a totally different actior from a "walla group" ("Walla Groups" are actiors brought in specifically to dub background audio--so, let's say we're shooting a loud party scene.... on-set, the background actors are going to be quiet. They're going to be faking taking, laughing, etc and pretending to dance to music that isn't there.... Then, in post, you bring in a walla group [aka "loop group"] to laugh, cheer, and, generally, make the noises of people at a party. walla actors also often get to overdub a character who might have one or two lines).
  • As I type this, they don't make the official announcement for another day, but it helps to have a friend in the company.


    Since you have a friend on the inside, do you know if they're planning to make any programming API's so people can integrate this into their game engines?  I can imagine this being very useful if they could make a way to put it in engine to generate new sounds on the fly, and I would be even more interested if that were the case.
    Like you said, this does seem a little high for such a specialized tool, but if they bring some cool stuff to the table it could very well be worth it.
     


    If you go back to TV shows and movies from about 1985 or earlier you can actually often hear where overdubbed elements are added to existing production audio. ADR (Automated Dialog Replacement--aka dubbing) on older productions often was only done for principal actors--so you'll hear a nice, clean studio take for the leads, then, suddenly, NOISE as they cut in the production audio for a day-player.


    Haha, I noticed this exact problem on Star Wars: A New Hope a few weeks ago.  Good speakers definitely don't help hide little tricks like that anymore.

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator

    Since you have a friend on the inside, do you know if they're planning to make any programming API's so people can integrate this into their game engines?  I can imagine this being very useful if they could make a way to put it in engine to generate new sounds on the fly, and I would be even more interested if that were the case.
    Like you said, this does seem a little high for such a specialized tool, but if they bring some cool stuff to the table it could very well be worth it.


    I don't have any serious insider information (NDA's must be respected, and I asked permission to post here and share this on Facebook since the official announcement is tomorrow....) All I can say is notice the "Lite" tag...
    From my contact: "This is the very basic version to see if people even care. We have some big plans if people are interested in buying it." Since this company is very interested in partner work with mobile game developers, I wouldn't be surprised if there were plans for a release of an API for real-time, in-game synthesis (Heck, that would really increase the usefulness of the product for it's primary target), but we'll have to wait and see.
    All I know is, for two months, I've been getting stories about deadline crunches and production stories, but only found out what the product was about five minutes before I created this thread. I was that excited by the demo video! (Heck, I probably have about 300,000 SFX in my own library once I take into account the Sony and Digital Juice libraries and the hundreds of SFX CD's I picked up over the years... And I'm still excited by this tool! Sometimes, for a quick and dirty, I think this might be a lot easier to do than go into sound forge and play with destructive edits....)


  • I don't have any serious insider information (NDA's must be respected, and I asked permission to post here and share this on Facebook since the official announcement is tomorrow....) All I can say is notice the "Lite" tag...
    From my contact: "This is the very basic version to see if people even care. We have some big plans if people are interested in buying it." Since this company is very interested in partner work with mobile game developers, I wouldn't be surprised if there were plans for a release of an API for real-time, in-game synthesis (Heck, that would really increase the usefulness of the product for it's primary target), but we'll have to wait and see.
    All I know is, for two months, I've been getting stories about deadline crunches and production stories, but only found out what the product was about five minutes before I created this thread. I was that excited by the demo video! (Heck, I probably have about 300,000 SFX in my own library once I take into account the Sony and Digital Juice libraries and the hundreds of SFX CD's I picked up over the years... And I'm still excited by this tool! Sometimes, for a quick and dirty, I think this might be a lot easier to do than go into sound forge and play with destructive edits....)


    Haha, gotta love those NDA's.  Hurts so much knowing more than you can talk about.
    Sounds very cool.  I'm working on starting up a small indie game project with some people, and if we get far enough along, I will be very interested in something like this.
    As far as film uses, yeah, it would be great to revamp a huge library such as yours whenever you want something just a little new.  I'm gonna have to pass this on to my friend who does all our sound work and see if he would want to use it.  He loves playing around with new audio tools.

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator
    My friend notes that, if you directly contact the company, they can give more information. She stressed to me, in all-caps, "THIS IS THE LITE VERSION." ;-)
    I've passed this on to my friends who work more mobile developers as well. Film use would be useful, but, a real-time API for this tool could really be a game-changer (pun intended) for game developers.
    Besides, even with a large library, sometimes you end up with only a few sounds that are useful (case in point, no Hollywood movie uses pistol sounds for pistols--they're usually using shotguns), so variety is good.
    Also, for my own library, well--a few years ago I made the mistake of having the primary, secondary and tertiary backups of my custom library (all the stuff I had recorded or built from scratch) in my car on the same day. I'd just wiped my master PC, the primary was going home to repopulate the library, the secondary and tertiary were going to friend's houses, off-site... Of COURSE that's the first day we had a vehicular break-in on my block in 20 years... Someone went around the block, smashed in a window of every car, popped all the trunks and stole the hell out of everything.
    Oh, when I say primary, secondary and tertiary backups--this wasn't just my sound library. This was EVERYTHING. I lost all my graphics projects, film projects, audio projects, file backups... everything I'd done for a decade! Including all the raw recordings of my band's two albums and all the minidiscs of our jam and rough sessions.... Sigh... At least with the band stuff we'd moved from recording live to minidisc in rehearsal to going directly to computer--all those newer songs existed, but, yeah... Ow. Oh, and a tripod. And a camera. The thief left the $1000 leather trenchcoat, and, while he took the minidiscs, CD binders and hard drives, he left the minidisc player. Took the basket of dirty laundry, though. Socks and boxers? He's welcome to them.
    Boy, I lost a lot of SFX. And a lot of that was done back before I cleaned up my act and stopped using pirated software, so a lot of that library, I couldn't recreate these days, since I no longer have the software I'd used in the first place. Oh, well....
  •  
    Wow, that's terrible.  I've lost files for past projects, and it sucks, but never anything of that magnitude.  You have my sympathies.
    Haha, ok.  I'll keep the LITE part in mind.  It will probably be at least a few months before it becomes necessary for me to contact them, but I will definitely keep it in mind and watch for further developments.  Our current project has no plans for mobile, so we would definitely have a lot more hardware overhead to work with.  Seeing where they go from here with this tool is very interesting to me.
  • Also, for my own library, well--a few years ago I made the mistake of having the primary, secondary and tertiary backups of my custom library (all the stuff I had recorded or built from scratch) in my car on the same day. I'd just wiped my master PC, the primary was going home to repopulate the library, the secondary and tertiary were going to friend's houses, off-site... Of COURSE that's the first day we had a vehicular break-in on my block in 20 years... Someone went around the block, smashed in a window of every car, popped all the trunks and stole the hell out of everything.
    Oh, when I say primary, secondary and tertiary backups--this wasn't just my sound library. This was EVERYTHING. I lost all my graphics projects, film projects, audio projects, file backups... everything I'd done for a decade! Including all the raw recordings of my band's two albums and all the minidiscs of our jam and rough sessions.... Sigh... At least with the band stuff we'd moved from recording live to minidisc in rehearsal to going directly to computer--all those newer songs existed, but, yeah... Ow. Oh, and a tripod. And a camera. The thief left the $1000 leather trenchcoat, and, while he took the minidiscs, CD binders and hard drives, he left the minidisc player. Took the basket of dirty laundry, though. Socks and boxers? He's welcome to them.


    Oh my God Triem - that's a devastating loss! 
    It's so frustrating when they don't even really take things that are of any value to anyone else besides the person they've stolen it from. Did they catch the person? 
    But major kudos to you for having a leather trenchcoat :)


  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator
    Nah, they never caught the person--oh, it's worse than I've already mentioned. I left out several things: The master video tapes of the most recent Halloween, for example... A co-worker had given me a coupe of boxes of his childhood comics. Among them were COMPLETE RUNS of Marvel's "Conan," "Red Sonja," and "Kull," comics, bagged, boarded and mint/near mint. That box was also in the trunk of the car to return to the co-worker--since the estimated value of the box was about $30,000, I was giving them back to him to sell on eBay!
    As I said, the thieves (and I have to assume multiple people, because they hit about 50 cars) smashed in windows and popped trunks ("boots," for you Brits. ;-) ) open. I can only assume four-or-five came along with a couple of pickup trucks, did quick smash and grabs, and tossed everything they took in the beds of the trucks to sort later. Oh, well.
    Back on topic--neat audio tool, eh?
  • Wow, Michael. That really sucks.  When I first bought my Jeep, it took a while to realize they don't need to break in, just reach in and grab. Even in nice neighbor hoods.
    Now a days, I do keep a complete set of backups in my truck, but they are locked in a pelican case, chained to the seat mount.  They could still get them, but they'll have to work for it :)
    The program sounds interesting. Would be a time saver over the whole pitch shift thing. Thanks for sharing.

    SInce ADR was mentioned, thought I'd throw out that if you have Vegas, it's very easy to setup for ADR. Will loop the video and original audio, while talent can quickly do multiple takes of the replacement dialog. Works great.
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator
    Yeah, loop recording in Vegas with each clip being stacked as a new take is a great ADR timesaver. Also did that on a couple of my last band's songs--just set the entire song to loop and do my lead vox takes back to back to back.

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