Suggestion: Keyframe behaviour tweak to save a lot of time...

When you add first keyframe and set value on it, this value should apply to everything after said keyframe, not the whole video.

Example:

How it works now:  You have a 100% scale video; You set scale keyframe in the middle of your timeline; Set value to 150%. Result: Whole video will be 150% scale.

My suggestion: You have a 100% scale video; You set scale keyframe in the middle of your timeline; Set value to 150%. Result: First half of the video will be 100% scale, but after that keyframe 150% scale.

This would allow to instantly change value using only 1 keyframe. (You can achieve the same result right now, but you'll need 2 keyframes or slicing)

To sum up, this change doesn't hurt filmmaking process in any way and could save time making some projects.

Comments

  • The whole point of keyframes is to change a value from A to B. Having one keyframe turn a video's scale into two values doesn't make sense- what if you change your mind and want the video to start at 110% scale instead? You wouldn't have a keyframe to adjust it.

    Constant keyframes sounds like what you're after.

  • edited August 17

    @inScapeDigital You would just click anywhere except the exact position of keyframe to adjust parameters of the whole video (except the part after keyframe ofc.)

    And it actually does make a lot of sense, because right now, if in comp shot I need to make the scale jump to let's say 150% and gradually go back down to 100%, I'll need to put a constant keyframe-> go to the next frame and put another keyframe with 150%value-> go to desired part of the vid and put normal keyframe with 100% scale.

    With my suggestion you would need only 2 normal keyframes.

  • @ToastmanTheBest You can't have the program automatically perform a task without reason- computers do what you tell them to. If there's no keyframe at the beginning, HitFilm won't know that you want the value to go from A to B.

  • @ToastmanTheBest While the method you propose may feel intuitive to you, it goes against how keyframes have worked in all animation tools that I'm aware of since the concept was first introduced decades ago.  I hate to say it, but history has you outnumbered.

  • I see the comments that are against this suggestion, but yet no mention of a single actual reason not to implement this idea. There is upside- saves a lot of time. Downsides- none.

    No offence, just trying to understand your point. So if you see a downside in suggested tweak, please mention it, because so far I don't see a real reason why this shouldn't be implemented.

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator

    Sure. Your method is telling the computer to predict what I want to do, and it's probably wrong. 

    You specifically posit creating a keyframe halfway through the shot, for a scale value of 150%, but having the computer automatically set an initial value of 100%? What if I want an initial value of 100%? Now the computer made a decision that isn't what I want, and now I have to return to frame 0 to set the initial value. That's twice as much work. 

    Clicking anywhere but the keyframe to set a new value that doesn't create a keyframe? So... Now you're forcing me to move my mouse to the create keyframe button every time I want one. That's additional movement for every keyframe and a slowdown of workflow. 

    As Jsbarret correctly notes this would give Hitfilm a non-standard workflow different from FCPX, Vegas, Avid, Boris FX, Boris Red, Premiere, Ae, Vegas, and, literally, every other program in existence, which is a wonderful way to alienate users of other software from migration to or addition of Hitfilm to their workflow. 

  • Aladdin4dAladdin4d Moderator

    Keyframes define the beginning or ending points of some type of change and work in series. The first keyframe will always be the beginning setting the properties for the entire layer until another following keyframe sets new ending values. The points are used to determine how many frames need to be generated and the amount of change per frame. This is called tweening. What you are proposing leaves out a variable that's needed for calculating tweened frames because tweening calculations must have beginning and ending points. 

    Put another way in order to do what you want HitFilm would still have to create a preceding keyframe internally to complete the tweening and hide it from the user.

    Taking it a step further, let's say the user wanted to go back and add more preceding keyframes. Does HitFilm keep the internal keyframe it already created and keep it hidden? Does it discard it or does it just mysteriously appear on the timeline for the user to deal with?

  • "Clicking anywhere but the keyframe to set a new value that doesn't create a keyframe? So... Now you're forcing me to move my mouse to the create keyframe button every time I want one. That's additional movement for every keyframe and a slowdown of workflow." - That's actually a good argument against, I didn't think about it.

    Can't really comment on the rest of what Triem23 and Aladdin4d said, since I'm not the programmer nor do I know how this software operates "behind the scene", but I'll add that, if you know how to improve something, don't let the standarts hold you back. Good luck with working on Hitfilm, really loving this software so far (apart from that rate strech tool+ comp shot bug :D) and thanks for your opinions.

  • I agree that long-held standards shouldn't necessarily stand in the way of improvement. However, I want to revisit what I pointed out earlier about the history of the keyframe concept.  There have been lots of amazing breakthroughs and improvements in so many parts of the process of computer animation since its very earliest days, but yet somehow the basic operation of keyframes hasn't changed.  I don't believe that's an accident, that nobody looked at the process to find a better way.  I wouldn't be surprised if other workflows have been proposed and tested over the years, but yet we're still using the same process today that they did in the early days.

    Sometimes there's definite room for improvement, and the HitFilm team is hard at work on things that can actually be improved.  With keyframes, though, we're long past the point of "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

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