More Textures for Hitfilm

I noticed there wasnt that many textures in Hitfilm. So I had an idea. Not sure if it will do any good. But I decided to go to the textures in my visionlab folder then I copied them and put them in my hitfilm folder. Hey Presto more Textures.

Comments

  • Good thinking madmike. HitFilm handles textures a bit differently than VisionLab did, so the results won't be identical, but the texture files from VisionLab are compatible, so it does quickly expand the library of available textures. As I create new effects/presets for HitFilm, I try to create new textures as well, not only so the effects are unique and original, but also to expand the catalog of file textures on hand. This way as the program continues to be developed, the options available will expand.
    If you want to make some texture files of your own, one if the abilities added in HitFilm is the ability to use full-color textures. So you can turn of the 'colorize' option for an effect, and import full-color images as textures, and all the original colors will be retained. Kinda fun to play with.
  • I tried some different textures, but stupid me I changed where HitFilm looks for textures. Now I can't find the HitFilm Textures. Can someone direct me to where they are please?

    Thanks.
  • C:\ProgramData\FXhome\HitFilm Ultimate\Textures (on my machine at least)
  • Excellent, thanks.
  • What exactly, image wise, can be used as a texture. Is there a limit in size, quality etc?

  • I noticed there wasnt that many textures in HitFilm. So I had an idea. Not sure if it will do any good. But I decided to go to the textures in my visionlab folder then I copied them and put them in my HitFilm folder. Hey Presto more Textures.

    Great Idea, thx. :-)
  • edited July 2011

    What exactly, image wise, can be used as a texture. Is there a limit in size, quality etc?

    You have much more freedom in Hitfilm than you did in VisionLab, if you ever messed with textures in VisionLab in the past.
    Textures in HitFilm are applied to their respective particles at actual resolution, so if you import two textures, one with an image size of 128x128 pixels, and the other at 512x512 pixels, the relative size difference will be maintained, even when the Scale of the effect is adjusted. I don't know if there is a hard limit on image size (I'll check with the programmers and let you know), but for the most part I find texture images in the 100-300 pixel range to be most effective. That can vary depending on the specific effect you are trying to build though.
    You can also use full-color images as textures, and retain their original colors, rather than assigning them a color within the program. The main limiting factor I can think of is that you will want to use image formats that retain alpha info; I recommend PNG personally. Without alphas every texture will be square, which generally doesn't make the most convincing effects.

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