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  • Oh gosh! Super excited! It looks at least as good as the original trilogy!
  • Looks excellent! Richard Armitage looks great as Thorin, Gandalf doing the odd bit of magic, Elves and Goblins and Orcs and Gollum! Score for this one will be similarly epic, hints of that already. Can't wait to see how they do Smaug!
  • Love it. The best thing about this trailer is that it completely rejects the two standard trailer formats for this kind of film - the Transformers bm-bm-bm-BAM style (which was fantastic when Transformers first did it, but has since become very tedious) and the inappropriate-rock-music style - and embraces its own aesthetic. It feels like the trailer properly represents the film, whether you like it or not.
    As others have said, I love that they've kept all the dwarves rather than combining them all into a single character or something lame.
  • Speaking of LOTR, there's something I never fully got and hopefully one of you can fill me in. What did the Ring do?? Everytime Frodo put it on he just disappeared. When Frodo was not wearing it, it still was making him weak/sick. Was the ring a Macguffin (sp?) to get the plot moving? Or did the ring just not work right on hobbits? Wasn't the ring supposed to give you power, and that's why everyone wanted it?
    Haven't seen any of the LOTR in a long time.
  • I think the idea is that it allowed you to control men's minds. Hence the 9 (?) rings that were made and given out to the kings (elves, dwarves, humans), but Sauron had the master ring (that rules them all), thereby giving him control over the entire land. Some of the kings that wore the rings ended up turning into the Ring wraiths.
    Note how when the ring is destroyed at the end, all the orcs suddenly wake up and go "huh?" before legging it.
    Generally, though, I think it's meant to serve as a metaphor more than anything else. It represents 'power' and its corrupting influence. Even those that seek power to do good will eventually be undone by it. See: all politicians ever.
  • Hi Yeah the One ring that Frodo possessed, was created by the Dark Lord to give him power over the whole land and the other rings of power. In a way the one ring embodied the Dark Lord's power and his spirit and without it he was incomplete. Anyone who possessed the ring eventually became corrupted by the Darkness of its master. The one ring continuously tried to make its way back to its creator, using various people along the way. So in truth only the Dark Lord could truly wield the ring fully because it was a part of him...anyone else only became subjected to its power and its Master. Even Gandalf the wizard refused to try to use it knowing its true nature.
  • Ok make sense, thanks guys! I really need to watch them again cause I didn't fully speak English when I did.
  • The books are also great, and (obviously) go into more detail than the films. Apart from Tom Bombadil, very glad he was left out of the films.
  • Looks amazing. Love the dwarves, love the song, love Freeman as Bilbo, love the visuals. It's crazy how much of a nostalgia trip it kicked off too. Seeing Gandalf and Elrond and Galadriel again is so cool. Can't wait.
  • You're such a fanboy, Aculag.
  • I am the reason that Staff Only changed his name. He couldn't compete with me anymore.
  • edited December 2011
    I'm really looking forward to this movie. I loved Peter Jackson's interpretation for the LOTR movies. The only quibble I have so far is a continuity issue. Gandalf specifically says that Bilbo hasn't changed a day in the Fellowship of the Ring. But the actor playing Bilbo is much younger than Ian Holm.
    Also, when the dwarves began singing, I couldn't help but picture them with ridged foreheads as a group of Klingons. I guess maybe it was their armor... :-?
  • edited December 2011
    Gandalf specifically says that Bilbo hasn't changed a day in the Fellowship of the Ring. But the actor playing Bilbo is much younger than Ian Holm.

    A long time passes in these movies/books without being explicitly stated. I don't think there are actually any dates in The Hobbit (the book), but it's a long time. Bilbo is something like 80 years older than Frodo, for example, and The Hobbit takes place when Bilbo was about Frodo's age in Fellowship (33).
    Also you must take The Ring into account. Its carrier appears to age more slowly than normal, which is why even though it took Frodo like 20 years to get to Mordor, he still looks the same. And that's also why Bilbo looked so much younger in Fellowship than he did when he died. His true age caught up with him.
    Also, "You haven't changed a day" is a pretty common compliment for an old friend. :)
    Edit: vvv That too.
  • I believe that Gandalf was saying Bilbo hadn't changed a day since the last time he saw him, which wasn't necessarily during the events of this film.
    This looks like its on course to be every bit the equal of Jackson's other Tolkien endeavors. Looking forward to it. I'm still curious where exactly they are going to split it in half, considering it will be two films. In LOTR Jackson always did an excellent job of providing some sense of conclusion to each film, while still leaving you anxious for the next one. I need to re-read the book and see if I can figure it out.
  • Very exciting, Im actually going to shell out for a trip to the Cinema for this one rather than just wait for the DVD release
  • The reason I bring up the age thing is because in the books it is specifically pointed out that Bilbo has not been aging. Part of the "Hobbit gossip" behind Bilbo's back (besides being strange for going on an adventure) was the fact that he wasn't aging like other Hobbits. Just for giggles, here is a quote from Wikipedia:
    The Fellowship of the Ring, the first volume of The Lord of the Rings, begins with Bilbo's "eleventy-first" (111th) birthday (on 22 September), 60 years after the beginning of The Hobbit. The main protagonist of the novel is Frodo Baggins, Bilbo's kinsman.

    The Ring had prolonged Bilbo's life beyond the normal hobbit span, and at 111 he still looked 50. While the Ring did not initially corrupt him as it had its previous owners, it was beginning to affect him; over the years, it had begun to prey on his mind when out of his sight, and he lost sleep and felt "stretched out and thin",[2] as he said to Gandalf.

    As for where they are going to split the story into two parts, my guess is that the split will be...


    ***spoiler alert***


    ... when they get captured by the Goblins at the summit of the Misty Mountains.

  • ... when they get captured by the Goblins at the summit of the Misty Mountains.

    I think the song used is foreshadowing this, so I would guess you're right.

  • Also you must take The Ring into account. Its carrier appears to age more slowly than normal, which is why even though it took Frodo like 20 years to get to Mordor, he still looks the same. And that's also why Bilbo looked so much younger in Fellowship than he did when he died. His true age caught up with him.
    Also, "You haven't changed a day" is a pretty common compliment for an old friend. :)
    Edit: vvv That too.

    can i just point out that Frodo spent 16 out of those 20 years in the shire planning what he should do.
  • edited December 2011

    The reason I bring up the age thing is because in the books it is specifically pointed out that Bilbo has not been aging. Part of the "Hobbit gossip" behind Bilbo's back (besides being strange for going on an adventure) was the fact that he wasn't aging like other Hobbits. Just for giggles, here is a quote from Wikipedia:
    The Fellowship of the Ring, the first volume of The Lord of the Rings, begins with Bilbo's "eleventy-first" (111th) birthday (on 22 September), 60 years after the beginning of The Hobbit. The main protagonist of the novel is Frodo Baggins, Bilbo's kinsman.

    The Ring had prolonged Bilbo's life beyond the normal hobbit span, and at 111 he still looked 50. While the Ring did not initially corrupt him as it had its previous owners, it was beginning to affect him; over the years, it had begun to prey on his mind when out of his sight, and he lost sleep and felt "stretched out and thin",[2] as he said to Gandalf.

    As for where they are going to split the story into two parts, my guess is that the split will be...
    ***spoiler alert***
    ... when they get captured by the Goblins at the summit of the Misty Mountains.

    also to point out, that bilbo's 50th birthday was spent floating down a river with the dwarves in barrels. he already had the ring by this time and so the aging difference is a make up effect to make Holme look more worn out than 50.
  • it looks brilliant! :D :))
  • Hey Haribo, for future reference, you can edit your posts to include all of that, so you don't have to post three times in a row. :)
  • A bigger continuity issue is that in Fellowship of the Ring we see a brief glimpse of Ian Holm finding the ring during the events of The Hobbit. Not quite sure how that's going to fit.
  • Oh man cant wait. I heard they were starting to make it like four years ago so seeing the trailers is quite cool. These films are not only one of my favorite of all time but they also are dear to me. The reason being is Lord of the Rings is what got me into making movies. The special features especially. I've watched all the special features to those films including the special extended versions about a hundred times. And actually that is probably a close estimate.
    I love Ian as Gandalf. So good at the part. Also I think they are going to have Sauraman in it too. Of course he died but I saw a guy they put prosthetics on and he looked and sounded very close to the original one.
    So excited.
  • edited December 2011

    I love Ian as Gandalf. So good at the part. Also I think they are going to have Sauraman in it too. Of course he died but I saw a guy they put prosthetics on and he looked and sounded very close to the original one.

    Wait, what? Christopher Lee is very much alive! And he will indeed reprise his role in The Hobbit. He actually shot his scenes in London, rather than traveling to New Zealand at his age.
    This trailer is outstanding, by the way. Although I can tell it's been shot on video (everything is so crisp and clean), the cinematography and production design still manage to look identical to The Lord of the Rings. Huge wave of nostalgia hit me watching this this, seeing Gandalf, Galadriel, Bag End, etc. The bit with Gollum at the end literally sent chills down my spine. Absolutely cannot wait.

  • A bigger continuity issue is that in Fellowship of the Ring we see a brief glimpse of Ian Holm finding the ring during the events of The Hobbit. Not quite sure how that's going to fit.

    I understand what you are saying... however, I think we will just have to let it go! ;)
    If that is the worst thing about the movie then I think I will be ok!
    I am really wondering where the first movie will end as well. The hobbit just doesn't feel like 2 (long) films without some padding.
  • Remember that Peter Jackson didn't initially plan on making two Hobbit movies. Rather, he wanted to make these two movies:
    1. The Hobbit
    2. A separate movie, that would "bridge the gap" between The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. This would have contained scenes that are referenced, but not seen in the other films and/or material taken from Tolkien's notes. In other words, it would have simply filled in more backstory to lead into The Lord of the Rings Trilogy.
    Somewhere along the long line that was the pre-production process, the idea of the "bridge" film was scrapped in favor of simply filming The Hobbit in two parts. In addition to just "splitting" the story in two, I assume that some of the elements that were supposed to make up the "bridge" film will find their way into both Hobbit films.
    On the same note, there are several actors appearing in The Hobbit film, despite their characters' complete absence from the source material: Elijah Wood is returning as Frodo, Orlando Bloom is returning as Legolas, and Evangeline Lilly will play an elf that isn't in the book. Elrond (Hugo Weaving), Galadriel (Cate Blanchett), and Saruman (Christopher Lee) might not appear in the book either, although I'm not sure --- I last read the book like eight years ago!
    I'm really interested to see where Jackson goes with this stuff. Normally I wouldn't advocate "changing" the source material so radically, but if I were to trust anyone to do it, it would be Peter Jackson.
  • Really looking forward to this one. For sure!

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